WAG 6yr old fears? Typical?

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Orangesoda

Proud Parent
Jul 15, 2014
153
Hey there. I haven't posted in awhile. I have a young 6yr old on pre-team. My understanding is her coaches are planning to have her compete L3 next fall. She'll turn 7 during the season.

My question regards fears at this age. Is it normal to have them? Or is it possibly an early sign she isn't cut out for gymnastics?

She doesn't obsess or anything. She enjoys class, and we don't talk about gym really at all other than the "how was class today" sort of convo. She mentioned the other day that she doesn't really try to make her stride circle when her coach isn't spotting because she's scared. I think I told her not to worry about it - that it would come in time. I know she also holds back with handstands on beam - scared she'll go over. She has no problem with back handsprings and other things I, as a mom, consider "scary."

Anyways, any insight from those with experience is appreciated. Thanks.
 
My gymmie made her coach stand on the floor for her RO-BHS the whole season in old level 4 (similar to new 3) -- not spot, just step onto the floor. She's still in gymnastics 6 years later and doing well. I don't know if it is related, but as mentioned above, she is gifted.
 
My DD had major fear issues on beam at that age. All cleared up around age 8/9 when she developed more confidence and now beam is her best event as an optional. She looks back now and laughs about how afraid she used to be in her early pre-team/team days. Just give your DD time and it will probably clear up.
 
It's normal. Kids of this age are usually still finding where they are in space, as her confidence improves so will the fear. She is still in the very early stages of her training.
 
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I coach a seven-year-old who, at ages five and six, could barely walk across high beam unassisted. Now she's one of my best beam workers. Her handstand, in fact, is better than anyone else's.

So give her time, it will all work out.
 
I could have written this post!!! My little one is the same. Not paralyzing fear but def afraid of a few things on bars and beam. She also seems like she may be a slow twitch kid, which makes me curious how far she will go in gym.
Somebody mentioned gifted children developing fears and I find that interesting because, while I think all my children are smart (of course! Lol), the 6 year old really is amazing. She's in 2nd grade( just turned 6) and doing well and already into 4th grade math. :/ Interesting connection or coincidence!
I look forward to seeing how your daughter progresses. :)
 
Ditto on me writing a very similar post. Mine started team last season level 3 at age 6. She struggled with ROBH and mill circle fears. As time went on, she got through it all and ended up doing very well at states. This season, age 7 level 4, she is now battling fears/inconsistency of not wanting to jump to catch the high bar with out having stacked mats under her. Some days she's fine, other days, she just won't do it.

She's a very cautious kid. Doesn't jump into things w/out thinking. Good for life, but how about gymnastics?

Do you have to be a "daredevil" to conquer big skills down the road?
 
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I have a few similar quirks among my developmental team girls, usually just a skill or two and nothing that interferes with them coming to the gym and enjoying themselves. Even my most fearless 6 year olds typically have something that they think twice about or need some extra time learning. I have a crazy talented little one who hates turns on beam- always moves to the low beam- but will pop up into an almost vertical handstand with no problem on the high beam. It says nothing about her ability as a gymnast, just that turns are still a little weird for her.
 
DD was 6 going on 7 when she started competing the old level 4 (now 3). I remember that she struggled with the ROBHS (got it then lost it then regained it before competition season). She said something about being nervous to do the skill before her 1st meet. Once I said that the coach could spot her if she needed it, she was fine. Kids eventually find ways to work through it, I think. Best thing to do on your end is keep things light. Fears seem to stay if the child feels that everyone around them is also anxious about that her getting that particular skill. DD's skills have come and gone (and eventually come back) and I stay calm (at least to her). :p I really think that it's normal for any kid in this sport. It just seems to come sooner to some than it does to others.
 
The scenario described is not a fear issue. It's a confidence issue. Confidence comes with time through repetition. And she has plenty of time, all of the gymmies of posters with similar scenarios have plenty of time!!!
 
Peanut - from what I have seen the "daredevil" will often be the first to get the bigger scarier skills, the "thinker " a bit longer...but they usually both end up at the same end point, often times the thinker a bit better It is not the speed in which the skill is acquired but the final execution that matters.
 
I am wondering if your child is on the gifted/highly intelligent side. Children that are of high intelligence seem to develop fears at an earlier age than their peers. Obviously there are exceptions to this, but it is something to consider.
I wondered about this myself. DD is a huge over thinker with skills. She likes the big skills but some she needs for level nine like the ro full dismount off beam she over thought for some time. Once she did it she commented, "Mom, I don't know why I wouldn't go. It's not even scary. " Thank goodness her coaches are always so understanding and have worked with her to get through her Over Thinking. Because as she says, "I'm not scared!"
OP, your DD will get passed her fears/OT. What I love most about gymnastics is that it teaches the child perseverance. That is the lesson they will carry with them not the fear or over thinking. Some of the things that come out of my child's mouth cause me to take a double take..."Are you sure you are only 11?" Sniff...she will be 12 next friday...
 
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I am wondering if your child is on the gifted/highly intelligent side. Children that are of high intelligence seem to develop fears at an earlier age than their peers. Obviously there are exceptions to this, but it is something to consider.

I have always wondered about my just turned 9 year old dd, she had what seamed like a fear of bean, hated it, not enough to stop coming to gym. My dd was stuck trying to land a cartwheel on the wide training beam for 6 months after falling 12 time in nearly practice, her coach wouldn't help her do anything to help her get past this and eventually both gymnast and coach become frausted as dd kept falling of the side,coach was told by a senior coach to lower the beam and stack a mat underneath so it was just touching the underside of the beam, dd landed a cartwheel straight away, next practice she went over to the high normal beam and landed her first cartwheel on that and has been fine ever since (2 months) and now beam is one of her favourite events and is now working back walkovers on floor fat beam and landing a few, looking back on it I think maybe a confidence issue as real fear would have driven her out of the gym eventually.

My dd seems to be a gifted child, above aveage in reading, writing, spelling and maths, good dancer, great writer and drawer and also good at gymnastics (not a hotshot but a good worker who turns up to all practices without being late, never cheats at conditioning and does as she is told at the gym, listens well and does her best), she seems to be good at nearly everything she tries (not fair lol)
 
Thanks for all the replies. Sounds like I needn't worry too much.

As for being "gifted," I'm not so sure. She's no dummy, and my husband and I are relatively smart I think, but she's not reciting Shakespeare or anything. Probably more likely that she's taken a few scary falls and is a little wimpy. Hah.
 
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The older DD gets, the less afraid she's gotten (then again, she's "only" a l7, so it's not like she's doing crazy things). Anyway, she gets more confident after she gets hurt. She realizes that the horror that she's built up in her mind isn't as bad as she thought it was going to be. :)
 
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Thanks for all the replies. Sounds like I needn't worry too much.

As for being "gifted," I'm not so sure. She's no dummy, and my husband and I are relatively smart I think, but she's not reciting Shakespeare or anything. Probably more likely that she's taken a few scary falls and is a little wimpy. Hah.
if she isn't reciting Shakespeare by now........ trade her in.... :D
 
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