For Parents Advise on telling coach what you want

GYMNASTICS
Parents... Coaches... Judges... Gymnasts...
DON'T LURK... Join The Discussion!

Members See FEWER Ads!
Join for FREE!
Status
Not open for further replies.
Apr 17, 2022
60
37
My DD told me she wants to do college gymnastics. That’s the goal.
She just made team and is 13 - turning 14 this year. She is finishing 7th grade next month.
She just made team a few weeks ago on XCEL silver. So she has a ways to go.
My question for the experienced , should she even say anything? She has a dream and a goal and is willing to do the work. But realistically? Is it achievable? I guess anything is possible?

Has anyone mentioned to their coach their long term goal and what was was the outcome - positive / negative? What you expected?
 
Feb 2, 2022
78
44
Congrats to your daughter!

There is a great thread on chalkbucket right now about L10/college that might be a good read for you, as it highlights the very, very competitive nature of college gymnastics and what it takes to get there.

I suspect coaches hear aspirations frequently, no matter how realistic. These are kids, after all. :) My daughter is 8 and thinks she will do college gymnastics. I have no idea what will happen in the next 10 years -- but we will not drive more than we already do or homeschool and both of those would likely be neccesary in order to get her there.

I probably would not mention unless asked (our coaches asked). Either way, have fun supporting her as she embarks on the new adventure of competitive gymnastics!
 

ProudGymnast

Gymnast
Fan
Feb 16, 2021
138
I'm going to be completely honest here. Realistically? No. There are plenty of girls your daughter's age or younger who are already in levels 8-10 who won't even make college D1, or even D3. The reality is, gymnastics is super competitive, without many college options. And there are other people making insane sacrifices. No, it's not at all realistic.

Not trying to be a Debbie-downer, I just want to make sure you know this before you sacrifice money, her health, and both of your sanity to get to a dream that's way ambitious and most likely not going to happen.

Nothing wrong with keeping her dream alive though, dreams help us work a little harder, and have a bit more fun. I wouldn't tell her the realistic side, just tell her you get what you put in, along with the twists of life.

Just know, that college success and she can have a successful, healthy relationship with gymnastics by fulfilling other goals. I mean, there's also club in some colleges (about L8) that could be a goal, or scoring a perfect 10, or making it to diamond, etc.

Sorry if I just squashed your hope I just know so many people wish they had someone be more straight forward with them.
 
Apr 17, 2022
60
37
I'm going to be completely honest here. Realistically? No. There are plenty of girls your daughter's age or younger who are already in levels 8-10 who won't even make college D1, or even D3. The reality is, gymnastics is super competitive, without many college options. And there are other people making insane sacrifices. No, it's not at all realistic.

Not trying to be a Debbie-downer, I just want to make sure you know this before you sacrifice money, her health, and both of your sanity to get to a dream that's way ambitious and most likely not going to happen.

Nothing wrong with keeping her dream alive though, dreams help us work a little harder, and have a bit more fun. I wouldn't tell her the realistic side, just tell her you get what you put in, along with the twists of life.

Just know, that college success and she can have a successful, healthy relationship with gymnastics by fulfilling other goals. I mean, there's also club in some colleges (about L8) that could be a goal, or scoring a perfect 10, or making it to diamond, etc.

Sorry if I just squashed your hope I just know so many people wish they had someone be more straight forward with them.
No swishing at all! This is exactly why I asked! I completely agree with the above. We will keep the dream and hope alive
 
  • Like
Reactions: ProudGymnast

Oopski

Proud Parent
May 25, 2012
494
Texas
She can absolutely do club gymnastics in college, I would encourage that path at her age and level.
 
Mar 20, 2009
257
I would be realistic with her. She is old enough to understand and to me she has a right to know what she is working towards.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Coach Kate

ldw4mlo

Proud Parent
Feb 13, 2015
6,533
62
She can absolutely do club gymnastics in college, I would encourage that path at her age and level.
Exactly.

Depends on what she considers “college”.

My daughter just recently found out that club gym in college is a thing. I just sort of assumed she knew but it really hit home for her when a former teammate of hers now A D3 diver, also went to Nationals with her college club team. And is thrilled. I think just in the last year she went from liking gymnastics to more like loving it.

Now all her gymmie teammates are excited that they can still do gym in college.
 
  • Like
Reactions: duyetanh

Pirouette

Proud Parent
Oct 16, 2014
222
51
Club gym in college (NAIGC) is still a collegiate experience in sport. And it's fun! We saw gymnasts compete at all levels, from bronze equivalent to probably L9/L10. Most were around XP/XD/L6-8. Some did the decathlon (competed all 4 women's events and all 6 men's events) and it was so inspiring and exciting.

If your gymmie is interested and you have the time and resources, take her to watch some different levels of college gymnastics meets. It's a great way to see what's out there.
 
  • Like
Reactions: txgymfan

A's Mom

Proud Parent
Nov 30, 2018
64
42
Your question is should she share her dream with her coach. Yes! Why not? What are they going to do - mock her? She's in middle school - plenty of time to learn and grow. You can do a deeper dive with her about realistic goals, but I don't know why her coach would not want to learn about her passion and drive. It doesn't need to be a special meeting, but also doesn't need to be a secret. Good luck to her!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.