For Parents Are JOs really done with gymnastics after senior year of high school

profmom

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Just want to put in another plug for NAIGC. Not only is it a great way to continue gymnastics, it also provides a good opportunity for a new college student to connect to a group of people with a lot in common. My DD can't wait to get back to her club team in the fall.
 

Mrsboots87

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Gyms in the US buy liability insurance on the private market, and insurers charge higher premiums to gyms that allow adults because claims for injuries are expected to be either more frequent or more expensive.

A lot of the cost has to do with the way health insurance works. If an injury can be blamed on the gym, the gym’s liability insurer and not the injured person’s health insurer has to pay the costs of treating the injury. (When there is a health insurance claim for what appears to be an accidental injury, the health insurance company contacts the patient to demand information about the incident and any potential sources of cost recovery. Our family has received several of these inquiries after fractures, etc.) In many cases this results in much higher health care costs, as the liability insurer does not have discounted rate agreements with health care providers the way a health insurer does.


Is this maybe different state to state? My daughter broke her arm at gym falling from high bar. We let the Dr know how the fracture happened. We used our insurance. We never gave which gym the injury occurred at. My insurance paid it and we never heard a peep asking about which gym she injured herself at and such. We also signed a waiver to be i. The gym stating the gym is not responsible for injuries that occur during regular practice ( baring neglect or intentional things I would imagine). So I don’t see how gym liability insurance would be affected country wide.
 

bogwoppit

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Is this maybe different state to state? My daughter broke her arm at gym falling from high bar. We let the Dr know how the fracture happened. We used our insurance. We never gave which gym the injury occurred at. My insurance paid it and we never heard a peep asking about which gym she injured herself at and such. We also signed a waiver to be i. The gym stating the gym is not responsible for injuries that occur during regular practice ( baring neglect or intentional things I would imagine). So I don’t see how gym liability insurance would be affected country wide.


I am sure gyms have to keep a record of injuries, and declare them.
 

ldw4mlo

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Is this maybe different state to state? My daughter broke her arm at gym falling from high bar. We let the Dr know how the fracture happened. We used our insurance. We never gave which gym the injury occurred at. My insurance paid it and we never heard a peep asking about which gym she injured herself at and such. We also signed a waiver to be i. The gym stating the gym is not responsible for injuries that occur during regular practice ( baring neglect or intentional things I would imagine). So I don’t see how gym liability insurance would be affected country wide.
Same with my any of my daughters injuries-3. All through our medical. And of course after I responded I notice how old the thread was. No idea how it even popped. Sorry
 

JBS

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We have insurance for adults at our gym... no issues there... clubs that want adults insure them... clubs that don't want adults do not insure them... it's just that simple. If your club does not have adults... look to the ownership... not the insurance companies.
 

3cats

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It seems that Tumbling and Trampoline has avoided this somewhat. In our region there are a handful of adult athletes competing in area meets. One of my daughter's teammates is looking for colleges that are near a T&T gym so she can continue to train and compete after high-school.
 
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gym_dad32608

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At our old gym, we know a girl that was a walk-on at a D-1 school, didn't like it, came home and competed level 10 last year with the same old gym. Don't know the facts/rules around it, but it did happen.
 

Aussie_coach

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Here in Australia the insurance you get as a registered gymnastics club automatically covers everyone. The vast major of clubs have adults. The fastest growing gymnastics program in the country is the program aimed at senior citizens.

Kids don’t leave their gyms when they graduate, they just stay until their are ready to be done. The oldest gymnast on my competitive team is 24. I was on the team, training 20 hours a week, until I was 28.
 

QuietColours

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Here in Australia the insurance you get as a registered gymnastics club automatically covers everyone. The vast major of clubs have adults. The fastest growing gymnastics program in the country is the program aimed at senior citizens.

Kids don’t leave their gyms when they graduate, they just stay until their are ready to be done. The oldest gymnast on my competitive team is 24. I was on the team, training 20 hours a week, until I was 28.
Do most kids live at home or near home and commute to a nearby college there, or do they go away to school and find a new gym near the school?
 

doublestrike

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There were several college gymnasts that competed at JO nationals this year bc their colleges didn’t compete. There were some that weren’t happy about it because it took spots from high schoolers that could’ve used the recruiting opportunity but there are no rules against it.
 

Aussie_coach

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Do most kids live at home or near home and commute to a nearby college there, or do they go away to school and find a new gym near the school?
Most kids live at home with their parents while attending University, most attend universities near home.

A lot don’t go to University, it is only encouraged for those with specific career aspirations or those who are more academically inclined. A lot just go to a trade school, or do an apprenticeship or just do a few different jobs until they work out what they want to do.
 

MILgymFAM

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Most kids live at home with their parents while attending University, most attend universities near home.

A lot don’t go to University, it is only encouraged for those with specific career aspirations or those who are more academically inclined. A lot just go to a trade school, or do an apprenticeship or just do a few different jobs until they work out what they want to do.
At what age would you say kids typically move out? Is it different with/without university in the mix? My husband and I have had major differences of opinion about when our kids should/have to move out, and I’m just curious if it’s just an American thing to rush them out.
 

ldw4mlo

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At what age would you say kids typically move out? Is it different with/without university in the mix? My husband and I have had major differences of opinion about when our kids should/have to move out, and I’m just curious if it’s just an American thing to rush them out.
Whose rushing kids out. If anything I find them staying home longer.
 

MILgymFAM

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Whose rushing kids out. If anything I find them staying home longer.
In our orbit (and it’s a wide swath both geographically and economically) people expect kids to attend a residential college and then live independently, or they expect them to get a job after high school and live independently. I don’t know many people who encourage their kids to live at home into their 20s, outside of attending a local university to save money by living at home- then it’s out by 22. Maybe not anyone. I’ve encouraged my kids that they’re welcome to stay as long as needed to save money for a successful launch to adulthood, with the caveat that they have to be either working/saving or in school after 18. I have zero desire to push my kids out unprepared for the costs of starting adult life- I want them to have cash to buy a car and get into a first place, and don’t want them to have to take on debt from their outset of their lives.
 

Aussie_coach

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At what age would you say kids typically move out? Is it different with/without university in the mix? My husband and I have had major differences of opinion about when our kids should/have to move out, and I’m just curious if it’s just an American thing to rush them out.
Kids usually move out when they feel they are ready. When they yearn for independence, have enough money saved, get married etc.

It’s quite common for them to move out and come back a few times before making the split.

Some will move out as soon as they can, most somewhere in their twenties, thirties is not uncommon. Some never leave.

It’s very individual and will depend on the child, the family, the relationship, their life goals and aspirations etc.

One big factor here is housing cost. It’s astronomical. I live in the suburbs, not the most major city, not that close to the CBD and you can’t buy a house in our street for less than 1.5 million.

Even small houses, not near anything are hard to get for let than $500,000. Not a lot of units and apartments available and they cost almost the same as houses.

Hence kids living at home and carrying on their gymnastics at their regular childhood gyms well into adulthood.
 

ldw4mlo

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- then it’s out by 22.
I don’t know any kid out at 22 these days. And I’m not counting time spent part of the year at college if they go away. Most are not getting their own nest until over 25, many closer to and over 30.
 

skschlag

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In our orbit (and it’s a wide swath both geographically and economically) people expect kids to attend a residential college and then live independently, or they expect them to get a job after high school and live independently. I don’t know many people who encourage their kids to live at home into their 20s, outside of attending a local university to save money by living at home- then it’s out by 22. Maybe not anyone. I’ve encouraged my kids that they’re welcome to stay as long as needed to save money for a successful launch to adulthood, with the caveat that they have to be either working/saving or in school after 18. I have zero desire to push my kids out unprepared for the costs of starting adult life- I want them to have cash to buy a car and get into a first place, and don’t want them to have to take on debt from their outset of their lives.

I see this too. Seems to be a US thing. Most kids I know are expected to be out by 22/23 with roommates, or something.
 
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MILgymFAM

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I don’t know any kid out at 22 these days. And I’m not counting time spent part of the year at college if they go away. Most are not getting their own nest until over 25, many closer to and over 30.
Interesting. I am pretty sure I know where you guys are from and we know lots of people there that fit into what I have said.. it’s a weird world. Ha.