Bar release moves

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Natasha

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My dd is starting to train release moves on bars. I watched last night as the coach spotted her on some drills. She said it was a bail? Also, last year her team up-trained straddle backs, but my dd was injured so she didn't get to train release moves last summer.
I am just looking for general info on training release moves. What are the typical releases to learn first and what would you consider necessary pre-requisites to learning working on release moves?
I can tell states are over, because she is coming home telling me about all these skills she is training that I have never heard of before! It is a fun time of the season though!
 

ALgymMom

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My daughter started out doing straddle back drills and they scared her to death, so instead she did pirouette 1st yr of level 8, 2nd year she started working Bail drills, which were not pretty for a while, but she liked them much better. She ask me to video her Bail drill last night at gym, she is now trying to get it to handstand. It's been a long process, but she's getting there. I no longer have to close my eyes! Lol http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sT1hJcPMYvY
 

Natasha

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THanks for the video! That was helpful! No one on my dd's team has release moves right now, so I have no idea what to expect or what it looks like learning them.
 
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Mack_the_Ripper

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Usually at my gym we start training them by doing them from a single rail onto a stack of mats. Then we drape a 4-inch mat over the low bar and do them on the real bars set, maybe set closer than we would normally go, and slowly work them outwards. Then we go from a four-inch mat to a sting mat with a spot, and then take away the spot and the sting mat. It would probably take at least three months or more to do the whole process just because it requires a lot of consistency and confidence.

For single-rail releases, we start doing drills, depending on what kind of release it is, and then do them in a spotting belt. Once those are good they work on them over the pit on a single rail - at first they're just practicing safe falls, not actually trying to catch. Then they start working closer to the bar to try to catch.
 

Granny Smith

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At my dd's gym the release move they do depends on the girls comfort level. Many of the smaller girls train the Pak, many train the baille (we call it shootover) and then there are some that do the straddle back.

Like a PP poster stated, they start doing the shootover from the high bar to mats with a spot, then it goes to the girls doing them on their own to the stacked mats. They they will place a mat over the low bar and then from a either a tap swing or a cast the work them to the low bar, always with a spot. Then when the girls have the confidence they can start to do them on their own with the mat. My dd was spotted on her shootover for what seemed like years, but it is actually the best because the coach would take her to HS and she was taught the proper shape she should be in.

Her 1st year of competing the shootover, she did it from HS, but she landed short of HS, so it was a C skill. By the end of the season last yr (the 1st yr of competing it) it was close to HS, but not completely in HS. Now this yr, she competes the skill from HS and consistently lands in HS, so now it is a D skill and will be great for her when she goes to 10 next year.

I feel one of the best things when training this skill is to be spotted as often possible, even if they are capable of the skill. I really believed that helped my dd with the correct body positioning and technique for the skill.
 
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dunno

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baille=bail=bail swing. if anyone is curious, this skill came from mens rings.:)
 

Natasha

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At my dd's gym the release move they do depends on the girls comfort level. Many of the smaller girls train the Pak, many train the baille (we call it shootover) and then there are some that do the straddle back.

Like a PP poster stated, they start doing the shootover from the high bar to mats with a spot, then it goes to the girls doing them on their own to the stacked mats. They they will place a mat over the low bar and then from a either a tap swing or a cast the work them to the low bar, always with a spot. Then when the girls have the confidence they can start to do them on their own with the mat. My dd was spotted on her shootover for what seemed like years, but it is actually the best because the coach would take her to HS and she was taught the proper shape she should be in.

Her 1st year of competing the shootover, she did it from HS, but she landed short of HS, so it was a C skill. By the end of the season last yr (the 1st yr of competing it) it was close to HS, but not completely in HS. Now this yr, she competes the skill from HS and consistently lands in HS, so now it is a D skill and will be great for her when she goes to 10 next year.

I feel one of the best things when training this skill is to be spotted as often possible, even if they are capable of the skill. I really believed that helped my dd with the correct body positioning and technique for the skill.

So if you hit one handstand it is a C skill and hit both it is a D skill? What if you neither start or end in HS, is it a B skill then? Is it allowed at L8? My dd just started doing them with only a light spot to the mat stacked and over the low bar. She is having lots of fun training them. She says she wants to compete it next year, but to me it looks like a skill that will take a long time to get.
 

Gymmonkeymomma

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DD did piroutte for L8 this year, although no one actually calls it a release move lol. She has been doing baile drills on and off all season but started focusing on them since States, going from low bar to a block. This week they added a bar on top of the block to get that feel of bar to bar. Finally yesterday (dd was so impatient) they did high to low with the sting may and stacked mats like Algymmom's video. She was so excited :d. Some of the other small girls train paks. It's all dependent on the girl and what's comfortable (and safe) for her.
 

Granny Smith

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So if you hit one handstand it is a C skill and hit both it is a D skill? What if you neither start or end in HS, is it a B skill then? Is it allowed at L8? My dd just started doing them with only a light spot to the mat stacked and over the low bar. She is having lots of fun training them. She says she wants to compete it next year, but to me it looks like a skill that will take a long time to get.

If it starts in HS and does not end in HS - C skill
If it starts in HS and ends in HS - D skill
If it does not start in HS, nor end in HS - B skill and can be competed at level 8
 
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