For Parents Getting to college/Olympics

Aussie_coach

Moderator/Coach
Staff member
Gold Membership
Coach
Proud Parent
Gymnast
Club Owner
Jan 4, 2008
3,578
Country
Australia
I don't know about this. Maybe I am misunderstanding what is being discussed. We have a couple of top tier gyms in our state that are known to drill-drill-drill shape/form and consistently win at all levels because they have impeccable form from the very early levels. Their skills do not suffer. They uptrain and are more than ready to compete a level ahead of where they compete.

Having said that I also know that my dd likely would not have thrived in that environment. She was the type of kid who wanted to compete a skills as soon as she got them fairly consistently, even if it meant a lower score.
In the gyms I refer to the uptraining is not encouraged at all. A level of absolute perfection is required in conditioning before a new skill is even begun.

The Australian levels system is also quite out of sync with development. If you compare Australian levels to the US levels. The degree of difficulty of skills like tumbling is significantly lower at each level, while the expectations for dance are much higher.

At younger ages kids are spending a lot of time on leaps, jumps, turns and perfecting dance, when the ability to have that polish really comes at an older age. Then waiting too long to learn skills and missing the key windows of opportunity.

We don’t subscribe to it and teach the skills in a different order, but most do be it hat is what is required to win comps.
 
  • Like
Reactions: txgymfan and gymgal

JBS

Administrator
Staff member
Gold Membership
Coach
Former Gymnast
Proud Parent
Sep 3, 2005
6,331
Wisconsin
Country
USA
I don't know about this. Maybe I am misunderstanding what is being discussed. We have a couple of top tier gyms in our state that are known to drill-drill-drill shape/form and consistently win at all levels because they have impeccable form from the very early levels. Their skills do not suffer. They uptrain and are more than ready to compete a level ahead of where they compete.

Having said that I also know that my dd likely would not have thrived in that environment. She was the type of kid who wanted to compete a skills as soon as she got them fairly consistently, even if it meant a lower score.

Not sure if you are misunderstanding or not. What you are saying, it's not necessary.
 

JBS

Administrator
Staff member
Gold Membership
Coach
Former Gymnast
Proud Parent
Sep 3, 2005
6,331
Wisconsin
Country
USA
When yiu teach with the condition, condition, condition until perfection and then drill shapes until perfection and then teach the skill method. Then you drive The really talented ones out of the sport, the ones with that amazing athleticism and energy. You attract compliant, perfectionist kids who will be quiet and do as they are told but not super gymansts.
Bam! This is a real deal statement!

 
  • Love
Reactions: novagymmom

lawgirl215

New Member
Proud Parent
Dec 27, 2020
1
49
Country
USA
Hi all!

A parent at our gym said today something that got me thinking. She had stated that in order for a gymnast to:

get a college scholarship she would need to be a level 10 by 14

And

To get to the Olympics she would need to be a level 10 by 10

Now I'm curious if anyone knows more regarding these statements and how true they are. My gymnast is a level 3 at 7 yrs and has only been doing the sport for a little under a year now. Just trying to get an idea of what her options will realistically be.


Just as an FYI….. Gabby Douglas, Simone Biles, and Laurie Hernandez were all level 9s at 11 y.o. And Madison Kocian, Aly Raisman, and MyKayla Skinner were all level 8s at 11 y.o. All made it to the Olympics (MyKayla alternate), so… take that age thing with a grain of salt. Although at some point age may play a factor, it will be better determine by drive, determination, talent, coaching, passion, lack of injury, etc….
 
  • Like
Reactions: PreciousJ

cmg

Member
Proud Parent
Jul 2, 2018
98
61
Country
USA
Just as an FYI….. Gabby Douglas, Simone Biles, and Laurie Hernandez were all level 9s at 11 y.o. And Madison Kocian, Aly Raisman, and MyKayla Skinner were all level 8s at 11 y.o. All made it to the Olympics (MyKayla alternate), so… take that age thing with a grain of salt. Although at some point age may play a factor, it will be better determine by drive, determination, talent, coaching, passion, lack of injury, etc….
There are also several articles out right now discussing the determent of pushing gymnasts (girls) to high levels at such young ages. It gives coaches the ability to totally control the young athletes and push them beyond what they should be doing and ability to mentally abuse (although I think there is not age limit for mental abuse). There was a recent NYT article about Chelsie Memmel titled "What if Everything You Know About Gymnastics is Wrong?" It is really spot on to this topic. I am hoping at least with my daughter since she started late and had some repeat compulsory years that she can reach her dream of college. But this year has been a kicker with no competitions and then an injury that took her out for two full months, she is starting back again now. Only time will tell and a lot of grit and determination, which luckily she has.
 

TumbleTimes4

Active Member
Proud Parent
Sep 13, 2016
505
37
Country
USA
Thanks. Very well written article. Does anyone know how Chelsie is doing? Will she be at Classics?
 

novagymmom

Member
Former Gymnast
Proud Parent
May 19, 2020
123
48
Country
USA
Love Chelsie and so excited to hear she'll be at Classics. Can't wait to watch her!!
 

HappyDDdriver

New Member
Proud Parent
May 16, 2018
42
Country
USA
Hopes Championships, Junior Elite, and the first group of Senior Elite will be on flo... The second Senior group will be televised.