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kris

Proud Parent
Jul 25, 2013
213
DD will be 12 next season, so she could have years of gymnastics left. She just finished her first year as a level 8. Everything was going really well until one day, mid-season where at the end of a very hard workout, think two solid hours of conditioning, DD ended up throwing a couple RO-BHS-Fulls when she meant to do layouts. This scared her. It became a big issue that is still going on over 2 months later. Recently, she had been hiding it well at the gym, but on Monday I told the wife of this husband/wife coaching duo, that the issue was still a big deal at home because she had gone from loving gym to wanting to quit. She told the husband, who is doing most of the coaching right now due to health issues with the wife, and yesterday he told DD if she was going to keep having this issue she might as well go home. This is basically how he handles fear. He sent another girl to sit at the lockers yesterday because she wouldn't throw her BHS-BT on the high beam without a pad for the first time, and he didn't want to spot her.

I know somehow we have to find a way to get her through her fear. As a side note, is this a vestibular thing? A thinking too much thing? It's not like she's scared to do a RO-BHS-LO on the floor, she's been doing them for years. She just has herself convinced she can only do fulls, so of course that's what she throws, and that is scary for her. I'd be scared too as I wouldn't want to be upside down feeling not in control of what my body did either.

I don't think I can send her back to the current JO team, as I can't trust the coach to help her get through this. All his getting upset with her isn't going to help. She's a perfectionist and a people pleaser, and I'm so mad at the coach who knows this, who knows she was struggling, and couldn't just be nice for one day. She hadn't been to gym in over a week because of this fear, I went to the coaches to tell them why she hadn't been there that she needed support. I finally talked her into trying it one more time, and now this. :( I just don't know what to do next. She could join the XCel team at her current gym. It's bigger than the JO team and the coaches are very nice. She won't likely progress much from where she is though. They only have one diamond level gymnast who is graduating this year. Plus, none of the XCel coaches have spotted bar releases, flipping vaults, or anything like that so it seems that she'd be stuck doing only what she knows how to do already. To me this route feels like the beginning of the end of her gymnastics. I can't imagine she'd want to spend six years doing the same skills she's doing now, but going there for a year or two would allow her to keep doing some gymnastics while she figures out what else she loves to do, as all she's really ever done was gymnastics. She's definitely a kid who needs a high level of activity to be happy and to keep her brain ready to learn outside of the gym.

We have several gyms within a 20-45 minute drive from our house. The next closest gym had one level 9, one level 8 and a handful of 7's this past year. I have heard good things about the environment there, especially the coaching, but have never been inside the gym. The one after that has no level 9's, most of their 8's are hurt, but DD would have friends there as she knows a handful of the level 6-7s and all of those girls love this gym. After that we have two more competitive gyms nearby. The first has level 10's and gymnasts who get college scholarships most years. Unfortunately, they have a reputation for pitting the girls against each other at workout, and being very hard on them. They get good scores, but I'm not sure my DD who is dealing with fear issues would thrive in that environment, nor am I sure they'd take a level 8/training 9 with fear issues as they have a huge level 8/9 team this year. And finally there is a gym that also has high level gymnasts, but we had two level 9's/training 10's leave for this gym a couple years ago and both have been hurt basically ever since. They've both been mostly out for two solid seasons. Doesn't exactly make me want to send DD there. There are more gyms about an hour drive away, but I don't know as much about them as the closer ones.

Is it too late for DD to switch this year? Is it worth calling around? How does one go about switching gyms? She's been at this gym since she was 2.5 years old. I just wish her coach would understand that his approach to fear is the big reason so many upper level girls ends up leaving for another gym. Before this issue DD really wanted to get to 10. Now she'd rather walk away from the sport entirely, but I feel like there has to be a way to get past this fear with the right people around her, instead of someone who doesn't accept that working through fear is part of the sport.

Thank you if you made it through my novel! And TIA for any advice!!
 
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MeetDirector

Proud Parent
Oct 13, 2008
946
Kris -

Slow down and take a breath. Your dd is a 12 year old level 8. Let me say that again - she is a 12 YEAR OLD LEVEL 8. I know you said you are spitting mad at this coach, but maybe you need to give communicating with him another chance. After all, you have been there for almost 10 years. I would highly recommend trying a sit-down discussion first a parent only meeting and then bring in your daughter and hopefully map out a plan to get past the bump.

Level 8 (and 9 and 10) are big transitions and she is only 12. There are physical things going on (and will be going on) that come into play. You have too much invested to be thinking Xcel (definitely don't do this, please) or thinking gym change.

There will be more bumps and how you (and your dd and the coach) handle this one will pave the way for the future.

Good Luck.
 
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kandkfunk

Proud Parent
Aug 7, 2012
431
I agree with MeetDirector.

Definitely don't make any decisions while you are mad. That usually doesn't turn out well.

Fear is a strange thing. It can come and go throughout her career or she may get over it and never have another issue. It may be vestibular or not. Others with more experience can probably weigh in on that. However, in the grand scheme of things, two months is not that long. She still has plenty of time to overcome this.

Good luck!
 

JoyAvenueMom

Proud Parent
Aug 24, 2012
525
Central US
This exact situation happened to a friend of my dd's. And, it was at almost exactly the same age. Her coach backed off and made some changes in how she "thought" about the twisting. (I don't know specifics) It helped a little. Then a new coach came in who was less patient and she left without trying to work through her issues with him. She ended up leaving WAG for power tumbling and is training at an Elite level. So, her tumbling issues resolved themselves int time...just like your dd's will. BUT, her new tumbling coach is NOT patient and often refuses spots. He KNOWS the athlete's abilities and insists they trust him. Keep in mind that another change that happens at this age is a decrease in their ability to reason and think logically. Crazy, huh? But that means the often infer emotions and intentions that do not exist. I agree with Meet Director, don't give up on this coach yet. Educate yourself and approach him as a partner in this journey. If you determine he has given up on her, then you can start thinking of alternatives. Anyone who competed L8 at 11yo does not need to think about Xcel. She just needs some time.
 

kris

Proud Parent
Jul 25, 2013
213
Kris -

Slow down and take a breath. Your dd is a 12 year old level 8. Let me say that again - she is a 12 YEAR OLD LEVEL 8. I know you said you are spitting mad at this coach, but maybe you need to give communicating with him another chance. After all, you have been there for almost 10 years. I would highly recommend trying a sit-down discussion first a parent only meeting and then bring in your daughter and hopefully map out a plan to get past the bump.

Level 8 (and 9 and 10) are big transitions and she is only 12. There are physical things going on (and will be going on) that come into play. You have too much invested to be thinking Xcel (definitely don't do this, please) or thinking gym change.

There will be more bumps and how you (and your dd and the coach) handle this one will pave the way for the future.

Good Luck.

Thank you!! This is an honest question, are you emphasizing 12-year old level 8 because 12 is such a hard age, 8 to 9 is such a hard transition or the sheer combo of the two?!? I know that two months is not that long of a time, but to go from dreaming of college gymnastics in 2021 in the middle of February to months of poor sleep, tears every night and wanting to quit tomorrow is so hard to watch especially when it's your kid. I know that hormones come into play now. I know that body changes that are coming soon can throw off strength and balance and generally make things hard. I know this is sort of a perfect storm and a time where so many quit anyway, but I've watched the same scenario play out with gymnast after gymnast at her gym over the years and very rarely with a happy ending. :( I will wait until I calm down and maybe even see if I can schedule another meeting with both coaches or at least with the one who is causing her so much grief instead of with the one I met with yesterday. I will try not to panic, but I just can't imagine another six years of every little fear becoming a much bigger issue because he won't show compassion for fear.

I agree with MeetDirector.

Definitely don't make any decisions while you are mad. That usually doesn't turn out well.

Fear is a strange thing. It can come and go throughout her career or she may get over it and never have another issue. It may be vestibular or not. Others with more experience can probably weigh in on that. However, in the grand scheme of things, two months is not that long. She still has plenty of time to overcome this.

Good luck!

Okay, I'll wait until I'm less mad, but DD is in tears refusing to go again today so it feels like something has to happen soon, mad or not. And I agree fear is so strange. She was fearful of her BHS when she was a little level 4 and made the coach stand out on the floor every single meet that year, not spot her, just be on the floor. I am grateful we made it from there to here without too many big fear issues.

This exact situation happened to a friend of my dd's. And, it was at almost exactly the same age. Her coach backed off and made some changes in how she "thought" about the twisting. (I don't know specifics) It helped a little. Then a new coach came in who was less patient and she left without trying to work through her issues with him. She ended up leaving WAG for power tumbling and is training at an Elite level. So, her tumbling issues resolved themselves int time...just like your dd's will. BUT, her new tumbling coach is NOT patient and often refuses spots. He KNOWS the athlete's abilities and insists they trust him. Keep in mind that another change that happens at this age is a decrease in their ability to reason and think logically. Crazy, huh? But that means the often infer emotions and intentions that do not exist. I agree with Meet Director, don't give up on this coach yet. Educate yourself and approach him as a partner in this journey. If you determine he has given up on her, then you can start thinking of alternatives. Anyone who competed L8 at 11yo does not need to think about Xcel. She just needs some time.

Interesting. I'm so glad it worked out for your DD's friend. I had never heard of this kind of fear in any other gymnast so we're having a hard time formulating a plan for getting past it. I do know that a little patience would go so far for DD. She needs time and space to work through this, and as of yet he won't give it to her. He just tells her she might as well not come to the gym or she might as well go home or whatever he feels like saying that day, and it crushes her. Ironically, I've spent the last year telling her that often when she feels the coach is mad or disappointed in her that it's more likely how she's feeling about herself and she's just projecting those emotions onto the coach. She does have a habit of doing that, but this does feel different. Sigh. Some days I wish I had just told her to stop flipping off the couch when she was 2 instead of enrolling her in gymnastics so she could learn to do it somewhere safely.

Thanks again to each of you!
 

kandkfunk

Proud Parent
Aug 7, 2012
431
There are other posts on CB about the exact issue your DD is facing. If I remember correctly, one girl could only do a 1.5 twist even when she was just trying to do a full. I think another kept twisting when trying to do a layout, just like your DD. Maybe you could do some searching to see if you can find those threads. I can't remember if there was a resolution.

I totally get where you are coming from and how hard it is to watch. My DD struggled with backward tumbling fear for almost 2 years. Lots of tears. Lots of failed attempts. She went from having a great BHS on beam to not being able to throw it at all. And she could never say why she couldn't do it. To this day, a year after quitting, she really doesn't understand it.

Maybe a break to clear her mind and reset her nerves will help? I don't know what the right answer is for your DD but I really hope you both can find some peace.

If she does decide to quit, just know that there is life after gym and she is young enough to still try so many things and become great at something new.

PS. Not trying to speak for Meet Director, but what I got for that post, was Oh my gosh, your daughter is only 12 and a level 8. That in itself is a huge accomplishment. Very few girls ever make it to level 8, let alone that young. Mine was 15 at level 8.
 
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wallflower

Proud Parent
May 16, 2012
2,362
CA
DD will be 12 next season, so she could have years of gymnastics left. She just finished her first year as a level 8. Everything was going really well until one day, mid-season where at the end of a very hard workout, think two solid hours of conditioning, DD ended up throwing a couple RO-BHS-Fulls when she meant to do layouts. This scared her. It became a big issue that is still going on over 2 months later. Recently, she had been hiding it well at the gym, but on Monday I told the wife of this husband/wife coaching duo, that the issue was still a big deal at home because she had gone from loving gym to wanting to quit. She told the husband, who is doing most of the coaching right now due to health issues with the wife, and yesterday he told DD if she was going to keep having this issue she might as well go home. This is basically how he handles fear. He sent another girl to sit at the lockers yesterday because she wouldn't throw her BHS-BT on the high beam without a pad for the first time, and he didn't want to spot her.

I know somehow we have to find a way to get her through her fear. As a side note, is this a vestibular thing? A thinking too much thing? It's not like she's scared to do a RO-BHS-LO on the floor, she's been doing them for years. She just has herself convinced she can only do fulls, so of course that's what she throws, and that is scary for her. I'd be scared too as I wouldn't want to be upside down feeling not in control of what my body did either.

I don't think I can send her back to the current JO team, as I can't trust the coach to help her get through this. All his getting upset with her isn't going to help. She's a perfectionist and a people pleaser, and I'm so mad at the coach who knows this, who knows she was struggling, and couldn't just be nice for one day. She hadn't been to gym in over a week because of this fear, I went to the coaches to tell them why she hadn't been there that she needed support. I finally talked her into trying it one more time, and now this. :( I just don't know what to do next. She could join the XCel team at her current gym. It's bigger than the JO team and the coaches are very nice. She won't likely progress much from where she is though. They only have one diamond level gymnast who is graduating this year. Plus, none of the XCel coaches have spotted bar releases, flipping vaults, or anything like that so it seems that she'd be stuck doing only what she knows how to do already. To me this route feels like the beginning of the end of her gymnastics. I can't imagine she'd want to spend six years doing the same skills she's doing now, but going there for a year or two would allow her to keep doing some gymnastics while she figures out what else she loves to do, as all she's really ever done was gymnastics. She's definitely a kid who needs a high level of activity to be happy and to keep her brain ready to learn outside of the gym.

We have several gyms within a 20-45 minute drive from our house. The next closest gym had one level 9, one level 8 and a handful of 7's this past year. I have heard good things about the environment there, especially the coaching, but have never been inside the gym. The one after that has no level 9's, most of their 8's are hurt, but DD would have friends there as she knows a handful of the level 6-7s and all of those girls love this gym. After that we have two more competitive gyms nearby. The first has level 10's and gymnasts who get college scholarships most years. Unfortunately, they have a reputation for pitting the girls against each other at workout, and being very hard on them. They get good scores, but I'm not sure my DD who is dealing with fear issues would thrive in that environment, nor am I sure they'd take a level 8/training 9 with fear issues as they have a huge level 8/9 team this year. And finally there is a gym that also has high level gymnasts, but we had two level 9's/training 10's leave for this gym a couple years ago and both have been hurt basically ever since. They've both been mostly out for two solid seasons. Doesn't exactly make me want to send DD there. There are more gyms about an hour drive away, but I don't know as much about them as the closer ones.

Is it too late for DD to switch this year? Is it worth calling around? How does one go about switching gyms? She's been at this gym since she was 2.5 years old. I just wish her coach would understand that his approach to fear is the big reason so many upper level girls ends up leaving for another gym. Before this issue DD really wanted to get to 10. Now she'd rather walk away from the sport entirely, but I feel like there has to be a way to get past this fear with the right people around her, instead of someone who doesn't accept that working through fear is part of the sport.

Thank you if you made it through my novel! And TIA for any advice!!

My daughter had the exact same problem last year. She was 9 and competing level 8. She was twisting all her layouts and didn't know how to stop. The coaches response was to scream at her while making her go again and again. Told her she was being disrespectful, threatened to kick her out. For awhile after that one day she was afraid to do any back tumbling. Except she didn't identify it as a fear, just that a) she was afraid she would twist and be yelled at b) it felt weird to do a layout.

I can't remember how long it took but she had to have a coach stand there for back tucks and layouts, then she only wanted to tumble in the pit. She didn't do her full again for 5 months. They just took it out of her routine. Thankfully there was a nice coach who took her aside and took her back to where she was comfortable. He wasn't her coach, but he worked with her after I spoke to the a**hole coaches regarding their behavior.

We left that gym shortly after because they were jerks. When she started feeling a little lost in twisting again, doing 1.5 when she was supposed to do a full, her new coaches always just back up to halfs and its easily fixed.

I'd first try talking to them and asking for a real solution. If they have none to offer, leave. Your DD is young and doesn't need to quit over this.
 

wallflower

Proud Parent
May 16, 2012
2,362
CA
I wanted to add that I do not think of twisting issues as the same as a true fear issue. I don't think that my daughter was afraid and she has never struggled with any kind of fear in any area. It was an issue of physically not knowing how to stop twisting. The fear was of being screamed at and humiliated. Don't assume your daughter has a fear issue.
 

kandkfunk

Proud Parent
Aug 7, 2012
431
I wanted to add that I do not think of twisting issues as the same as a true fear issue. I don't think that my daughter was afraid and she has never struggled with any kind of fear in any area. It was an issue of physically not knowing how to stop twisting. The fear was of being screamed at and humiliated. Don't assume your daughter has a fear issue.

This is a great point.
 

sce

Proud Parent
Mar 11, 2014
6,149
I don't have any personal experience but wanted to chime in a few thoughts. 1) Coaches here have mentioned girls getting the twisties. I assume that it what you are dealing with. Sounds like a normal gymnast problem. Please tell her that. It happens, many are able to work through it. 2) it sounds like a reasonable coach knows how to respond and unreasonable coaches make the problem worse. Your daughter in dealing with the worse kind. That is a big issue. Coaches need to know how to handle the issues that crop up in high level gymnasts. 3) a 12yo level 8 is an amazing thing! She is also old enough to have a say in what's next. What does she want to do about the issue?
I think you should set a meeting ASAP with the coaches. Discuss the issue. Explain that she wants help in working past it. That getting yelled at or kicked out just raised her level of anxiety. See what the coaches say. From there she has to decide to stay, quit or go elsewhere.

If it comes to going elsewhere, I would try out more than one gym. Take your dd to talk with the coaches and try a workout or two. See what fits best. This process might help her clarify where she is with gymnastics too.
 
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kris

Proud Parent
Jul 25, 2013
213
There are other posts on CB about the exact issue your DD is facing. If I remember correctly, one girl could only do a 1.5 twist even when she was just trying to do a full. I think another kept twisting when trying to do a layout, just like your DD. Maybe you could do some searching to see if you can find those threads. I can't remember if there was a resolution.

I totally get where you are coming from and how hard it is to watch. My DD struggled with backward tumbling fear for almost 2 years. Lots of tears. Lots of failed attempts. She went from having a great BHS on beam to not being able to throw it at all. And she could never say why she couldn't do it. To this day, a year after quitting, she really doesn't understand it.

Maybe a break to clear her mind and reset her nerves will help? I don't know what the right answer is for your DD but I really hope you both can find some peace.

If she does decide to quit, just know that there is life after gym and she is young enough to still try so many things and become great at something new.

PS. Not trying to speak for Meet Director, but what I got for that post, was Oh my gosh, your daughter is only 12 and a level 8. That in itself is a huge accomplishment. Very few girls ever make it to level 8, let alone that young. Mine was 15 at level 8.

Thank you for your advice!! I had tried searching, but couldn't find anything. After reading the word "twisties" in this thread I was able to find a few. I told DD this is a pretty common problem and people get past it. That seemed to help reassure her. I actually did gymnastics when I was young and quit at 12. I played volleyball and ran track after that and loved both. The biggest difference between me and DD though is that I had a talent, but never really a passion for gymnastics. DD was LOVING gymnastics right up until that one day. I won't stop her from quitting, but I hope she can work through this and quit because she's done with loving the sport not because of a mental block. I appreciate the reminder though that there is life after gym, and that getting to level 8 at 11 is really quite the accomplishment.

My daughter had the exact same problem last year. She was 9 and competing level 8. She was twisting all her layouts and didn't know how to stop. ... I'd first try talking to them and asking for a real solution. If they have none to offer, leave. Your DD is young and doesn't need to quit over this.

Thank you!! I'm glad your DD got through this and found a more supportive environment. I am not a confrontational person by nature, but I think in this case I'm going to have to pull out the mama bear and stand up for my DD.

I wanted to add that I do not think of twisting issues as the same as a true fear issue. I don't think that my daughter was afraid and she has never struggled with any kind of fear in any area. It was an issue of physically not knowing how to stop twisting. The fear was of being screamed at and humiliated. Don't assume your daughter has a fear issue.

You're right it's not really a fear issue per say as she'll still try layoutw and does fulls with no issue, but for her there is beginning to be a fear issue attached beyond the fear of getting yelled at. She is afraid it's going to spread and suddenly she'll twist a yurchenko or double flyaway off bars, and get hurt. It's not the same the kind of fear issue that causes you to stop going for things though, she just finds the whole worry very mentally draining, and it's taking all the fun out of the sport she loves.

I don't have any personal experience but wanted to chime in a few thoughts. 1) Coaches here have mentioned girls getting the twisties. I assume that it what you are dealing with. Sounds like a normal gymnast problem. Please tell her that. It happens, many are able to work through it. 2) it sounds like a reasonable coach knows how to respond and unreasonable coaches make the problem worse. Your daughter in dealing with the worse kind. That is a big issue. Coaches need to know how to handle the issues that crop up in high level gymnasts. 3) a 12yo level 8 is an amazing thing! She is also old enough to have a say in what's next. What does she want to do about the issue?
I think you should set a meeting ASAP with the coaches. Discuss the issue. Explain that she wants help in working past it. That getting yelled at or kicked out just raised her level of anxiety. See what the coaches say. From there she has to decide to stay, quit or go elsewhere.

If it comes to going elsewhere, I would try out more than one gym. Take your dd to talk with the coaches and try a workout or two. See what fits best. This process might help her clarify where she is with gymnastics too.

Thank you!! You are right, she is definitely old enough to have the final say in what the next steps should be. As of now she's just not sure what she wants other than for this whole thing to magically not have happened. :)

I'm really glad to have found this place before this all began. It's so nice to know that she is not alone in going through this, that you guys don't think we should give up on her gym quite yet, and that I'm not crazy for being so upset.
 

MeetDirector

Proud Parent
Oct 13, 2008
946
Kris -

Sorry for the delay getting back to you.

I was referring to both her age and the transition to level 8. Both are rough and, as someone else upchain said, this has to be solved with everyone (athlete, parents, and coaches) working together. Let me also stress again, please take going Xcel off the table. Your daughter sounds like a very competent gymnast and she has plenty of time to get over this rough patch and still do college gymnastics. Maybe she just needs a break? These girls put thier bodies and minds through so much during the season and maybe this is her bodies way of telling her to rest.

Your being upset is normal; you feel helpless and you want to fix your girl. BTDT. If it hasn't been yet, let me tell you that from here on out in her gymnastics career success will come from everyone working toward the same goal. Stand up for your girl, but trust the coaches on the gymnastics side of the equation.

I truely wish you the best and the strength to weather this.
 
D

Deleted member 14190

Not a fear issue. Regardless , the treatment is the same, time and rest. Talk to her coach request a break from tumbling and more tramp time. Layouts with arms up the whole time is a good drill to stop the twist. And relax, your emotions are just as critical and influential as hers. :). More on the drill, grab a piece of foam, hold it with both hand above head , bounce and flip, keeping the arms above head during everything, tilt pelvic under and push it forward during set to attain a set and snap for rotation. After a few weeks take it to the floor / pit and just set and kep arms up. If you don't have a pit then she will just need a spot.
 
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kris

Proud Parent
Jul 25, 2013
213
Kris -

Sorry for the delay getting back to you.

I was referring to both her age and the transition to level 8. Both are rough and, as someone else upchain said, this has to be solved with everyone (athlete, parents, and coaches) working together. Let me also stress again, please take going Xcel off the table. Your daughter sounds like a very competent gymnast and she has plenty of time to get over this rough patch and still do college gymnastics. Maybe she just needs a break? These girls put thier bodies and minds through so much during the season and maybe this is her bodies way of telling her to rest.

Your being upset is normal; you feel helpless and you want to fix your girl. BTDT. If it hasn't been yet, let me tell you that from here on out in her gymnastics career success will come from everyone working toward the same goal. Stand up for your girl, but trust the coaches on the gymnastics side of the equation.

I truely wish you the best and the strength to weather this.

Thank you, thank you!!

Not a fear issue. Regardless , the treatment is the same, time and rest. Talk to her coach request a break from tumbling and more tramp time. Layouts with arms up the whole time is a good drill to stop the twist. And relax, your emotions are just as critical and influential as hers. :). More on the drill, grab a piece of foam, hold it with both hand above head , bounce and flip, keeping the arms above head during everything, tilt pelvic under and push it forward during set to attain a set and snap for rotation. After a few weeks take it to the floor / pit and just set and kep arms up. If you don't have a pit then she will just need a spot.

Thank you!! What do you do if a coach simply won't let her take a break, and would rather just keep telling her she might as well go home if she can't stop twisting when she doesn't want to twist?!? That's the crux of the issue right now. I have faith that if DD could have the time and space to work through this she could, but she can't be in the gym without him yelling at her and she can't fix this at home, so I find myself here hoping someone has a magical answer. That's actually why I was considering Xcel for her. I know those coaches well and any of them would help her through this. I'm just not sure she get through it with the current coach, and, at her gym right now, there is no other coach for JO. I do appreciate what you are saying. I know the coach knows way more about gymnastics than I do, but I wish he would believe that I know my daughter, and that his approach to this issue isn't going to work for her. Sigh. Thanks again for the advice!!
 
D

Deleted member 14190

Well if you're ready to pull her out of the program then you have nothing to lose so I would schedule a meeting with the coach and tell them that you are willing to leave. Obviously I would word it a little better.... And then Ask if it would be possible to do the drills that You heard about online. Seriously you have nothing to lose so who cares.
 

MeetDirector

Proud Parent
Oct 13, 2008
946
So, why not do some privates with the other coaches (that just happen to coach Xcel)? They wouldn't be coaching her for Xcel, but just helping her work past her JO twisting/flipping bump. Oh wait - I bet the only JO coach you have won't allow anyone else to coach JO, right? Time for a cool, calm face-to-face with THE coach and lay it out there - if he wants her to remain in his program, then this is what needs to happen. Cool, calm, matter-of-factly; as little emotion as possible.

Good Luck.
 

Seeker

Proud Parent
Aug 30, 2012
6,687
USA
Not a fear issue. Regardless , the treatment is the same, time and rest. Talk to her coach request a break from tumbling and more tramp time. Layouts with arms up the whole time is a good drill to stop the twist. And relax, your emotions are just as critical and influential as hers. :). More on the drill, grab a piece of foam, hold it with both hand above head , bounce and flip, keeping the arms above head during everything, tilt pelvic under and push it forward during set to attain a set and snap for rotation. After a few weeks take it to the floor / pit and just set and kep arms up. If you don't have a pit then she will just need a spot.

See -- this is what a "coach" does; you know --> actually help and teach their students when needed. If only all that wore the moniker actually did!! Good job, coachp!!
 
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