WAG thoughts on American athletes competing for other countries in international competitions?

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Faith

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Gymnast
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Aug 17, 2011
2,179
Do you think NCAA would be poorer for losing some of the big names like Peng Peng or Danusia ?

I am only just learning about NCAA as we have nothing really comparable here. Although some Universities do recruit overseas students who may be given places over UK- for example Oxbridge and rowing. They will give academic places to the students who will benefit the Uni rowing team. I do know students who have been given Uni places without the necessary academics because of their sporting ability.

But back to NCAA- Is the sport side not almost advertisement for the college? People follow UCLA gymnastics for example, it raises the profile of the college and attracts more applications generally, plus it may also mean the college attracts funding in the form of donations etc.

So does the scholarship system not benefit the college as much as the athletes? Therefore recruiting those who will ensure the athletic programme remains high profile also drives the success and continuation of the programme?

Same for academic scholarships?

DD1 is currently looking at NCAA, although not gymnastics. Quite a few of her team mates have been recruited over the last few years- I don't think the US has maybe the depth of field it has in gymnastics so the coaches are looking elsewhere for athletes that will benefit their programmes- bigger programmes, more money, more scholarships for both US and overseas athletes?


Just musing.
 

Muddlethru

Proud Parent
Mar 16, 2011
3,536
I think American athletes should be allowed to compete for another country with no caveats. The Belarus situation did not sit well with me at first and I wouldn’t do it. But if the desire and dream of the athlete is so great, they are willing to face criticism and be blasted for it, step right ahead.

As far as NCAA, if a foreign student earns a spot in a team, she should be allowed to be in the team. However, I don’t think non-American citizens should be entitled to any scholarship money, funding etc. Their education must be fully funded by them.

My two older kids went to UC Berkeley (no sports). They were born in California. My husband was born in California. I lived in California for 25 years. My husbands entire family lives in California and half my family lives in California. We moved to the east coast when my kids were in elementary school. We applied for residency status end of their sophomore year and was denied. (My son who has since graduated is still in California and working now working there). We paid full tuition all four years despite having paid enough taxes for decades. If Americans can’t utilize school funding, I don’t think international students should be entitled to it.
 

Flippin'A

Proud Parent
Dec 4, 2017
306
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I'm really not following the logic of denying foreign students access to NCAA sports scholarships. Sports are actually a huge revenue source for the school (not necessarily gymnastics, but for sure things like football and basketball) and the players are an investment, not a charity. Also, with the exception of military based schools, public universities in the US are funded by the state, not the federal government. So if the theory is that foreign students haven't contributed the tax dollars to warrant a scholarship, then out of state students should also be ineligible to get funding at a public university. I believe that sports scholarships are, and should be, merit based. Anyone who fits the qualifying criteria, both academically and athletically, should be eligible. I see this as a distinctly different argument than whether a US athlete should be allowed to compete for a different country because they're representing a university, not a nation. They must attend that university to compete, just like everyone else.
 

Muddlethru

Proud Parent
Mar 16, 2011
3,536
I'm really not following the logic of denying foreign students access to NCAA sports scholarships. Sports are actually a huge revenue source for the school (not necessarily gymnastics, but for sure things like football and basketball) and the players are an investment, not a charity. Also, with the exception of military based schools, public universities in the US are funded by the state, not the federal government. So if the theory is that foreign students haven't contributed the tax dollars to warrant a scholarship, then out of state students should also be ineligible to get funding at a public university. I believe that sports scholarships are, and should be, merit based. Anyone who fits the qualifying criteria, both academically and athletically, should be eligible. I see this as a distinctly different argument than whether a US athlete should be allowed to compete for a different country because they're representing a university, not a nation. They must attend that university to compete, just like everyone else.

US citizens pay both federal AND state taxes. As such, they pay some form of taxes to our country no matter how you look at it. We contribute to our economy, etc. Additionally, I believe and this is my opinion, right or wrong, the U.S. has more than its share of talented athletes to field their teams. Next year’s gymnastics recruits have “elites” from different countries. They’ve competed a couple meets in the U.S. and based on their scores alone in JO meets, have been less than stellar compared to other JO athletes who have not been recruited. Some elites in other countries are not even as good as some of our non-elite gymnasts. But the word “elite” in their resume gives them an unfair advantage. I merely prefer our citizens be given some kind for priority.
 

Flippin'A

Proud Parent
Dec 4, 2017
306
34
It appears as though you are not from the U.S. because U.S. citizens pay both federal AND state taxes. As such, your argument about debunking state funded scholarships is incorrect. Additionally, I believe and this is my opinion, right or wrong, the U.S. has more than its share of talented athletes to field their teams. Next year’s gymnastics recruits have “elites” from different countries. They come to the U.S. and compete and based on their scores alone in JO meets, have been less than stellar compares to other JO athletes who have not been recruited. I merely prefer our citizens be given some kind for priority, something similar to getting in state and out of state tuition.
Born and raised in the US. I never mentioned what taxes Americans pay, but rather stated that, with the exception of military schools, public universities are funded through the states, not the federal government. The federal government does help with certain aspects of higher education in the form of things like Pell grants, which are not available to international students. I believe that high level athletes, whatever their place of birth, are an asset to the school. Just as I believe that high level academic students and highly talented artists and musicians should be granted scholarships based on merit, not birth certificate. You've said your opinion, I've said mine.
 

gymgal

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Aug 22, 2008
4,686
Also, with the exception of military based schools, public universities in the US are funded by the state, not the federal government.
federally subsidized student loans pay a huge chunk of the bill. While theoretically the student/parent is to pay that back, reality shows otherwise - to the tune of $100 billion in defaulted loans, which eventually is carried by the federal taxpayers. so, the federal government, and the taxpayers do fund public universities.
 

Tmacs

Proud Parent
Feb 19, 2019
230
Interesting... I’m a dual citizen who toys with the idea is moving back to my dad’s country... if my dd sticks with gym, I know she would do well there and I’d have no problem with it! My dad competed internationally in swimming for that country so how cool if his granddaughter does gym...
 

InbarSquirrel

Proud Parent
Jan 28, 2013
199
As fun to dream of having my daughter compete for her father's home country, Romania - it's a flat out no. The financial burden of the logistics such as coaching, medical, facility to train in, and travel to politics within the country is a big deterrent. Currently we are dealing with a childhood family friend who stole my husband's identity to take out a car loan out in my husband's name. The Romanian court is going after our family back in Romania for the unpaid car loan:( The system is corrupt.

Maybe it would be different if it was another country... Either way I rather stick to dreaming.
 
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