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princesspower36

Proud Parent
Mar 11, 2022
7
22
Hi all,
My daughter is entering her second year of comp. she’s 9 (turning 10) and expected to be level 4/5 this year.

As last summer’s training schedule was still disrupted by COVID restrictions, we weren’t sure what to expect for this summer and only got the summer schedule after we made some plans already.

Anyway, she is “required” to train 6 out of 9 weeks but we could only do 5 of 9 weeks due to previously planned events. 2 weeks training in early July, 2 weeks off late July, a week of training, 2 weeks off early Aug and then two weeks on late Aug. 20 hours a week training in summer, will be 16 hrs in the fall.

She is serious about gym - she’s actually starting at a public school in Sept for high performer athletes - school in the mornings and training 4 afternoons a week.

I’m wondering if this training is sufficient to make progress? I guess I’m a bit concerned because there are a couple of new coaches who just joined who won’t really see her when she’s training consistently, as she was all school year. (Not that we can change it at this point lol).
 

txgymfan

Staff member
Gold Membership
Coach
Fan
Sep 4, 2008
3,533
Houston
Hi all,
My daughter is entering her second year of comp. she’s 9 (turning 10) and expected to be level 4/5 this year.

As last summer’s training schedule was still disrupted by COVID restrictions, we weren’t sure what to expect for this summer and only got the summer schedule after we made some plans already.

Anyway, she is “required” to train 6 out of 9 weeks but we could only do 5 of 9 weeks due to previously planned events. 2 weeks training in early July, 2 weeks off late July, a week of training, 2 weeks off early Aug and then two weeks on late Aug. 20 hours a week training in summer, will be 16 hrs in the fall.

She is serious about gym - she’s actually starting at a public school in Sept for high performer athletes - school in the mornings and training 4 afternoons a week.

I’m wondering if this training is sufficient to make progress? I guess I’m a bit concerned because there are a couple of new coaches who just joined who won’t really see her when she’s training consistently, as she was all school year. (Not that we can change it at this point lol).
Take your vacations. Enjoy them and make memories. Gym will work itself out.
 

Tammie

Member
Jul 22, 2022
90
44
Hi all,
My daughter is entering her second year of comp. she’s 9 (turning 10) and expected to be level 4/5 this year.

As last summer’s training schedule was still disrupted by COVID restrictions, we weren’t sure what to expect for this summer and only got the summer schedule after we made some plans already.

Anyway, she is “required” to train 6 out of 9 weeks but we could only do 5 of 9 weeks due to previously planned events. 2 weeks training in early July, 2 weeks off late July, a week of training, 2 weeks off early Aug and then two weeks on late Aug. 20 hours a week training in summer, will be 16 hrs in the fall.

She is serious about gym - she’s actually starting at a public school in Sept for high performer athletes - school in the mornings and training 4 afternoons a week.

I’m wondering if this training is sufficient to make progress? I guess I’m a bit concerned because there are a couple of new coaches who just joined who won’t really see her when she’s training consistently, as she was all school year. (Not that we can change it at this point lol).

Take the vacations, make the family memories!!

In a few years you will have more issues taking as many vacations(but I still recommend getting a couple of vacations in anyway).

At this age(especially) the gymnastics will work itself out!!

For now, enjoy your weekends off, enjoy your family time as much as you can, it's irreplaceable time!! Before you know it, you will have Saturday gym and/or morning practices, and all sorts of other things that you don't have to worry about now!!
 

sw2017

New Member
Aug 1, 2022
14
29
Hi all,
My daughter is entering her second year of comp. she’s 9 (turning 10) and expected to be level 4/5 this year.

As last summer’s training schedule was still disrupted by COVID restrictions, we weren’t sure what to expect for this summer and only got the summer schedule after we made some plans already.

Anyway, she is “required” to train 6 out of 9 weeks but we could only do 5 of 9 weeks due to previously planned events. 2 weeks training in early July, 2 weeks off late July, a week of training, 2 weeks off early Aug and then two weeks on late Aug. 20 hours a week training in summer, will be 16 hrs in the fall.

She is serious about gym - she’s actually starting at a public school in Sept for high performer athletes - school in the mornings and training 4 afternoons a week.

I’m wondering if this training is sufficient to make progress? I guess I’m a bit concerned because there are a couple of new coaches who just joined who won’t really see her when she’s training consistently, as she was all school year. (Not that we can change it at this point lol).
Take a vacation, especially since it was already pre-planned. Let her make memories while she can
 
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Caesarea

New Member
Aug 11, 2022
20
United States of America
Take vacation! She is only 9/10 years of age and barely Level 4/5 -- I am concerned about the sports school arrangement and what that means for other activities, social life, academics and mental health. Sorry to say it, but she is NOT a "high performer athlete" nor on an Elite/High Performance pathway if she's 9/10 and in Compulsories, and her second year of competitive gymnastics. I would put her in regular school (although it might be too late to change that enrollment choice now...) and at least one other extracurricular activity, if at all possible.

20 hours a week (even in summer) is unreasonable for a Compulsory athlete of any age. She's going to have a good competitive career and might even have a chance of doing NCAA gymnastics in the U.S. (you're in Canada right now, right?) IF she trains smart (avoid injuries and burnout, live and eat well, stay healthy), and that starts with less hours. Heck, Jade Carey went all the way to Olympic gold for the USA without being Elite until age 17 and Level 10 until age 14/15, which is a time frame that is theoretically attainable for your daughter, as well, if she stays healthy. I would say that 12 hours, in addition to no training during Spring/Winter Break, and a month (or at least two to three weeks) off in June/July would be appropriate for her age and level.

Gymnastics Canada has a great resource known as Long-Term Athlete Development (LTAD) that outlines appropriate training hours for age and level. At ages 9-11, a National-level gymnast should be doing 16 hours. She is younger and not as high-level, so should be doing a little less.

TLDR; train less hours (around 12-15); take vacation; stay healthy, keep her love of gym alive, and she may still make it far, particularly in a country like Canada where the competition isn't nearly as intense as over here in the United States!
 

princesspower36

Proud Parent
Mar 11, 2022
7
22
Yep, we are on vacation now :).

I agree that 20 hrs is a lot - I think the extra vacay actually helps offset that since she’s only training 5 of 9 weeks.

The high performer program is the name the school calls it (not gymnastics specific, for all different sports). we could switch back if we wanted, but this program gives her the same curriculum and actually a better school-life balance. She is still able to do other school activities as well, and she takes swimming on the weekend. I figure the new school is worth trying this year (she is really keen and has never wavered so we’re following her lead) and worse case scenario she can return to her home school.

I’ve no idea where this gymnastics thing will go for her - we fell into comp gymnastics accidentally (invited in after doing rec gymnastics for a few yrs, never on preterm etc).
 
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GymMomStarQuest29

Proud Parent
Jan 9, 2022
47
20 hours a week (even in summer) is unreasonable for a Compulsory athlete of any age. She's going to have a good competitive career and might even have a chance of doing NCAA gymnastics in the U.S. (you're in Canada right now, right?) IF she trains smart (avoid injuries and burnout, live and eat well, stay healthy), and that starts with less hours. Heck, Jade Carey went all the way to Olympic gold for the USA without being Elite until age 17 and Level 10 until age 14/15, which is a time frame that is theoretically attainable for your daughter, as well, if she stays healthy. I would say that 12 hours, in addition to no training during Spring/Winter Break, and a month (or at least two to three weeks) off in June/July would be appropriate for her age and level.
This. My daughter just turned 9, she’s done 20.5 hours per week of gymnastics per week this summer. We took one wee off for a family vacation and when she went back she cried. She’s quitting. Total burnout. Take your vacations, keep the hours to a minimum and live your life.
 
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Tammie

Member
Jul 22, 2022
90
44
She is only 9/10 years of age and barely Level 4/5 -- I am concerned about the sports school arrangement and what that means for other activities, social life, academics and mental health. Sorry to say it, but she is NOT a "high performer athlete" nor on an Elite/High Performance pathway if she's 9/10 and in Compulsories, and her second year of competitive gymnastics. I would put her in regular school (although it might be too late to change that enrollment choice now...) and at least one other extracurricular activity, if at all possible.

20 hours a week (even in summer) is unreasonable for a Compulsory athlete of any age. She's going to have a good competitive career and might even have a chance of doing NCAA gymnastics in the U.S. (you're in Canada right now, right?) IF she trains smart (avoid injuries and burnout, live and eat well, stay healthy), and that starts with less hours. Heck, Jade Carey went all the way to Olympic gold for the USA without being Elite until age 17 and Level 10 until age 14/15, which is a time frame that is theoretically attainable for your daughter, as well, if she stays healthy. I would say that 12 hours, in addition to no training during Spring/Winter Break, and a month (or at least two to three weeks) off in June/July would be appropriate for her age and level.
Seriously? How do you know she is not a high performance athlete???

Did you know that McKayla Maroney was 12yrs old in L5? By your definition she wasn't on an elite pathway nor was she a high performing athlete. However I think most people would disagree with you.

Every athlete is on a different path!! There are many ways to get to the same place!!

As for training hours, my L4(who is 10-1/2) spends a minimum of 28hrs in the gym(typical is 30-32hrs with some 35/36hr weeks thrown in...she would live at the gym if we let her, she wants more hours, her coaches wont give them to her in an attempt to avoid burnout). However she too is on her own unique path-one that wouldnt work for most kids & not one that even could work in most gyms(my kiddo is in a small gym where they can customize her path-where she is able to split her day and train 2 levels at once, plus still have time for some individualized uptraining). She will be L6 and possibly 7 this spring at a highly competitive gym and is expected to be elite in 2-3yrs.

Our gym's L5/6 MINIMUM hours for safety is 22hrs(although L4 min is 12hrs). So 20hrs does not seem problematic or excessive to me!

Her daughter may well be an amazing, natural talent that is expected to explode in optionals, none of us know her daughter's path or what her coaches have planned for her-nor what her individual goals are, maybe NCAA is where she has her sights set?!? Maybe she doesn't know yet and is just having fun???
 

Kara

New Member
Jul 16, 2013
26
Seriously? How do you know she is not a high performance athlete???

Did you know that McKayla Maroney was 12yrs old in L5? By your definition she wasn't on an elite pathway nor was she a high performing athlete. However I think most people would disagree with you.

Every athlete is on a different path!! There are many ways to get to the same place!!

As for training hours, my L4(who is 10-1/2) spends a minimum of 28hrs in the gym(typical is 30-32hrs with some 35/36hr weeks thrown in...she would live at the gym if we let her, she wants more hours, her coaches wont give them to her in an attempt to avoid burnout). However she too is on her own unique path-one that wouldnt work for most kids & not one that even could work in most gyms(my kiddo is in a small gym where they can customize her path-where she is able to split her day and train 2 levels at once, plus still have time for some individualized uptraining). She will be L6 and possibly 7 this spring at a highly competitive gym and is expected to be elite in 2-3yrs.

Our gym's L5/6 MINIMUM hours for safety is 22hrs(although L4 min is 12hrs). So 20hrs does not seem problematic or excessive to me!

Her daughter may well be an amazing, natural talent that is expected to explode in optionals, none of us know her daughter's path or what her coaches have planned for her-nor what her individual goals are, maybe NCAA is where she has her sights set?!? Maybe she doesn't know yet and is just having fun???
What on earth are you talking about? McKayla Maroney was a 7 year old level 5, and at 12 a Level 10 competing at nationals. Not saying that OPs daughter can't be a successful gymnast, but the things you are posting are either made up, exaggerated, or just plain ridiculous.
 

HappyDDdriver

Proud Parent
May 16, 2018
47
What on earth are you talking about? McKayla Maroney was a 7 year old level 5, and at 12 a Level 10 competing at nationals. Not saying that OPs daughter can't be a successful gymnast, but the things you are posting are either made up, exaggerated, or just plain ridiculous.

AGE AT FIRST YEAR OF ELITE​

Highest Possible Age: 11 years old



Alyssa Baumann - 12 (2010, from L9)
Simone Biles - 14 (2011, from L10)
Nia Dennis - 12 (2011, from L10/Hopes)
Gabby Douglas - 12 (2008, from L10)
Brenna Dowell - 13 (2009, from L10)
Bailie Key - 11 (2010, from L10)
Madison Kocian - 12 (2009, from L9)
Maggie Nichols - 13 (2011, from L10)
Aly Raisman - 15 (2009, from L10/Hopes)
Kyla Ross - 12 (2009, from L10)
MyKayla Skinner - 12 (2009, from L10)
Jordan Chiles - 12 (2013, from L10)
Christina Desiderio - 13 (2013, from L10)
Jazmyn Foberg - 13 (2013, from L10)
Laurie Hernandez - 12 (2012, from L10)
Sydney Johnson - 13 (2013, from L10)

Average Age: 12.56 years

This has been shared before on ChalkBucket but it is always interesting to see again.
 
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Tammie

Member
Jul 22, 2022
90
44
What on earth are you talking about? McKayla Maroney was a 7 year old level 5, and at 12 a Level 10 competing at nationals. Not saying that OPs daughter can't be a successful gymnast, but the things you are posting are either made up, exaggerated, or just plain ridiculous.
This is my bad and i realized this weekend(even before this thread, just in conversation with a friend) where/how i got all mixed up between personal stories & mymeetscores(why do they do things different for different gymnasts??? Where one gymnast will have 2 or more entries-one at each gym they attended & another will list the last/most recent gym & put everything under that heading)& actual date of gym transfer vs recruitment date.

It all turned to mush and came out wrong. I apologize for that!!
 

Livelovegymnastics

Gymnast
Fan
Mar 20, 2022
51
Seriously? How do you know she is not a high performance athlete???

Did you know that McKayla Maroney was 12yrs old in L5? By your definition she wasn't on an elite pathway nor was she a high performing athlete. However I think most people would disagree with you.

Every athlete is on a different path!! There are many ways to get to the same place!!

As for training hours, my L4(who is 10-1/2) spends a minimum of 28hrs in the gym(typical is 30-32hrs with some 35/36hr weeks thrown in...she would live at the gym if we let her, she wants more hours, her coaches wont give them to her in an attempt to avoid burnout). However she too is on her own unique path-one that wouldnt work for most kids & not one that even could work in most gyms(my kiddo is in a small gym where they can customize her path-where she is able to split her day and train 2 levels at once, plus still have time for some individualized uptraining). She will be L6 and possibly 7 this spring at a highly competitive gym and is expected to be elite in 2-3yrs.

Our gym's L5/6 MINIMUM hours for safety is 22hrs(although L4 min is 12hrs). So 20hrs does not seem problematic or excessive to me!

Her daughter may well be an amazing, natural talent that is expected to explode in optionals, none of us know her daughter's path or what her coaches have planned for her-nor what her individual goals are, maybe NCAA is where she has her sights set?!? Maybe she doesn't know yet and is just having fun???
Your posts honestly confuse me. First of all, I would like to know the reasoning behind having a minimum of 22 hours for safety. For level 5/6, 22 hours seems a little excessive, how is that for safety? How do more hours correlate to safety?! Am I missing something because your entire post confuses me.
 
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Kara

New Member
Jul 16, 2013
26
Your posts honestly confuse me. First of all, I would like to know the reasoning behind having a minimum of 22 hours for safety. For level 5/6, 22 hours seems a little excessive, how is that for safety? How do more hours correlate to safety?! Am I missing something because your entire post confuses me.
It's not just you...
 
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Tammie

Member
Jul 22, 2022
90
44
Your posts honestly confuse me. First of all, I would like to know the reasoning behind having a minimum of 22 hours for safety. For level 5/6, 22 hours seems a little excessive, how is that for safety? How do more hours correlate to safety?! Am I missing something because your entire post confuses me.
I typed exactly what is stated in our handbook and was said in the parent meeting when we were given the handbooks-that the minimum hours are required for safety, if anyone is consistently not meeting hours, they will be asked to leave the team as it is not safe to have less hours.

I don't know why, would have to ask our HC who makes the rules ;-)
 

JPC13

Proud Parent
Mar 25, 2022
185
I typed exactly what is stated in our handbook and was said in the parent meeting when we were given the handbooks-that the minimum hours are required for safety, if anyone is consistently not meeting hours, they will be asked to leave the team as it is not safe to have less hours.

I don't know why, would have to ask our HC who makes the rules ;-)
That looks like it says that levels 5 and 6 go between 4 and 5.5 hours a day for 4 days a week. That means that the actual minimum is 16 hours a week for a level 5/6.

In fact, it similarly says that the minimum for levels 7 and 8 are also 4 hours for 4 days a week.

And... it clearly says safe and successful which is different than "safe". I fully believe a level 6 probably needs to be training at least 16 hours a week to be... successful. Most people here would probably agree.
 
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Tammie

Member
Jul 22, 2022
90
44
Also, despite the fact that it SAYS 4-5.5hrs, 4days/wk, they don't really mean it. We do not have a single L6 that does 4hrs, they all do 5.5/day plus Saturdays during competition season(Jan-April), a couple of L5s did 4hrs last year-but only if they did Saturdays, when they did not/could not do Saturdays, they had to do 5.5.

My kiddo has missed the last 4 Saturdays due to family fun, the HC had a chat with her yesterday & she was told that she cannot miss any more Saturdays until end of Nov(after state).

My kiddo attends 6hrs, 4days, plus has 3.5hrs of privates(1hr each floor, beam, & bars/vault, 30min conditioning/PT for hypermobility-its actually 60min, but she doesnt participate in group warmup/basics that day, so she only is in the gym an extra 30min). So I felt comfortable missing a few Saturdays since it was summer-ok, guess not ;-)

I am just a gym parent like everyone else, I don't know the why's, just how we do things-&what we are told.

Honestly, I joined CB hoping to understand everything better, however our gym does things so much different that I don't know that it helps all that much-lol.
 

Mish

Proud Parent
Aug 15, 2015
687
53
I'm just concerned about the "you are representing your gym at all times in your life even outside of the gym" statement. Umm, yes be a good person, no you are not defined by the gym you go to.
 
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Tammie

Member
Jul 22, 2022
90
44
That looks like it says that levels 5 and 6 go between 4 and 5.5 hours a day for 4 days a week. That means that the actual minimum is 16 hours a week for a level 5/6.

In fact, it similarly says that the minimum for levels 7 and 8 are also 4 hours for 4 days a week.

And... it clearly says safe and successful which is different than "safe". I fully believe a level 6 probably needs to be training at least 16 hours a week to be... successful. Most people here would probably agree.
In our parent meeting successful was never mentioned, only safety.

As for hours, it's not so cut & dry(as I mentioned above), HC spelled out that 4hrs for L5 MUST include Saturdays(that is 22hrs, either way). That L6 is 5.5hrs plus Sat in competition season(that's 28hrs during comp season & 22hrs otherwise).

And if you continue reading, it states any fewer hours and injuries are likely to occur...which is safety in my eyes, although you could argue it also affects success if you want.

We had a girl last year in L5 doing 4hrs without Sat, she was asked to do better, they did not, so they were asked to leave and that was that. Her mother was told that it wasn't safe for her to remain, she was a liability, so that was that.

So I can show you what it says, I can also tell you how it is and what we are told. Those are 2 different things at our gym(kinda)-lol. Keep in mind that we have around 35-40 girls from pre-team to L10/elite AND excel. We have girls try out & be rejected just about weekly(usually on conditioning from what I hear from DD), the coaches get tape from girls/parents daily. So we all do what we have to do to keep our spots-lol.

We got lucky to get our spot, although as I'm told, she may have gotten lucky to get the spot, but she works hard to retain her spot!