For Parents What do you consider to be a good score?

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Ty’s Dad

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First off you need to take a big fat chill pill dude! If you read what I wrote! I merely stated that the comment of “far beyond other gymnast “ was a bit much! Basically saying there are many parents on this forum that have talented kids! Get over
If you didn’t mean nothing by it and you was “ basically saying something you would have put a LOL at the end. You knew what you was doing with that comment.
 

josie55

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I haven't read this whole thread but want to weigh in on a few things:
  1. @Ty’s Dad: your daughter is amazing. I am excited to watch her journey. Thank you for sharing her story with us.
  2. @Ty’s Dad: the last line in your last post WILL trigger some people, not because your dd isn't incredible (she is!) and hasn't experienced major struggles (she has!) but because you're comparing her to other kids, and challenging other parents to do the same ("name other kids who have had a struggle like my daughter.") I'm not interested in getting into a competition about who has struggled the most, and hopefully others are not, either. I understand (to the extent that I am able; I'm sure my understanding is not complete) that you've been though A LOT and want make sure people understand that your situation is unique. I get that it made you angry when another poster said that your daughter's talent is not far beyond that of others. I also hope that you can appreciate that other parents on this board have kids who have experienced major struggles, and have also experienced wonderful success.
  3. Everyone reading this: as tempting as it might be, can we try to not get into a pissing match about whose child has struggled the most or experienced the biggest hardship? And we definitely don't need to fight about which gymnasts have exceptional or "far beyond" talent. Please?
  4. I found the argument about quitting interesting to read. I thought @Ty’s Dad brought up a provocative point that I hadn't really considered. I'm glad he's on here and posting because hearing different POVs is valuable and something we don't always get enough of. I also think that while a lot of the response was based on people having been on this journey longer and being able see the future a bit more clearly, I also think that each kid is different. If I'm not careful, I can be a bit self-righteous about the importance of not pushing, b/c I have a gymnast who pushes herself far more than I would ever push her. But I must remind myself that I have another child (non-gymnast) who benefits from a bit of a push in her sport. They are all different, and hopefully we parents can do our best to figure out the right level. Of course as someone mentioned earlier, if we screw it up they can work it out in therapy as adults ;-)
Happy Holidays, everyone!
 

Flicfliclay

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I haven't read this whole thread but want to weigh in on a few things:
  1. @Ty’s Dad: your daughter is amazing. I am excited to watch her journey. Thank you for sharing her story with us.
  2. @Ty’s Dad: the last line in your last post WILL trigger some people, not because your dd isn't incredible (she is!) and hasn't experienced major struggles (she has!) but because you're comparing her to other kids, and challenging other parents to do the same ("name other kids who have had a struggle like my daughter.") I'm not interested in getting into a competition about who has struggled the most, and hopefully others are not, either. I understand (to the extent that I am able; I'm sure my understanding is not complete) that you've been though A LOT and want make sure people understand that your situation is unique. I get that it made you angry when another poster said that your daughter's talent is not far beyond that of others. I also hope that you can appreciate that other parents on this board have kids who have experienced major struggles, and have also experienced wonderful success.
  3. Everyone reading this: as tempting as it might be, can we try to not get into a pissing match about whose child has struggled the most or experienced the biggest hardship? And we definitely don't need to fight about which gymnasts have exceptional or "far beyond" talent. Please?
  4. I found the argument about quitting interesting to read. I thought @Ty’s Dad brought up a provocative point that I hadn't really considered. I'm glad he's on here and posting because hearing different POVs is valuable and something we don't always get enough of. I also think that while a lot of the response was based on people having been on this journey longer and being able see the future a bit more clearly, I also think that each kid is different. If I'm not careful, I can be a bit self-righteous about the importance of not pushing, b/c I have a gymnast who pushes herself far more than I would ever push her. But I must remind myself that I have another child (non-gymnast) who benefits from a bit of a push in her sport. They are all different, and hopefully we parents can do our best to figure out the right level. Of course as someone mentioned earlier, if we screw it up they can work it out in therapy as adults ;-)
Happy Holidays, everyone!
I also hope that you can appreciate that other parents on this board have kids who have experienced major struggles, and have also experienced wonderful success.
This is all I was insinuating.. period
 

mommyof1

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I think what rubs people the wrong way is when a parent asks a question about normal, average JO gymnastics, a parent of a kid on the elite track gives a flippant answer that denigrates the vast majority of kids who are out there giving the sport their all (at our gym only a 38 is good, at our gym a kid who is scoring 36s would get sent to Xcel, my kid just is more driven and talented than yours so you couldn’t possibly understand, I wouldn’t waste my money if she weren’t winning every meet, etc.), there is pushback saying that not every gymnast has to be a phenom, and then the parent of the phenom gets defensive and claims that they were only talking about their own very special child when in fact they were replying to a more general question.
 

mommyof1

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I also think that anyone who thinks a kid would actually give up a sport she truly loved for “a boy” doesn’t know much about teenage girls. The high-level athletes and musicians I’ve known who have taken a step back have never done so just because they were distracted by a romantic partner or a fraternity/sorority or friends or the like. Even when “wanting to have a normal life” or “changing priorities” was the cited reason, those priorities have always shifted for a deeper reason. The athlete realizes that they aren’t as phenomenal as they thought or they just don’t love the sport as much any more. The musician realizes that they would rather have a stable career than forever live on the edge. The athlete is tired of living with constant injuries. There are deeper personal issues that lead to a lack of confidence. Etc. It’s never really just about a boy—and if it is, how healthy is a relationship where the boy wants the girl to give up her talent so she can pay more attention to him?
 

txgymfan

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Clearly the answer to the original post is “It depends on a thousand variables that can change by the moment. It is different for every gymnast, every parent, every coach, every day and every meet. Ultimately, every single practice and every single meet that a gymnast walks away from is successful no matter what the scores.

I’m locking this thread. Moving on!
 
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