WAG Help working my toe on front off dismount?

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Aug 3, 2016
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Title says it all ^


I'm trying to learn a toe on front off dismount like so:




Suggestions?

I can do the sole circle part correctly according to my coach, but apparently, I don't open enough. I've heard arching a ton helps. Can anyone find any other things that might help me?

When I'm on pit bar, it's usually because we are with the combined group and both the coaches are over working with the group so I don't get too much help with these skills. I don't want to learn it wrong, so can anyone give me tips?

giphy.gif


Video of the toe on front


This was the first one I've ever done, and now I'm able to land not on my butt, but unfortunately I don't have a video of it :D But anyway, anything that will make this easier?
 
Also, I'm working on getting my giants by myself. Once I have giants, do you think I'll have more power going into it and therefore be able to go higher and have more time to rotate?
 
To answer the giants question, I think that depends. It's harder to do a toe-on from a giant than just a giant by itself or a giant-giant - if you have any technique/body shaping issues in the giant you will really notice when you try to connect them. If you can cast higher or do a cast handstand into your toe-on, you'd get a bit more power and that would be more like doing it from a giant.

I've never personally worked toe-on fronts but what I see from the gif is you are popping your toes off the bar way too early. The earlier your toes come off, the less height you will have when you flip. Right now when your toes come off, you are only horizontal (parallel with the ground). If you do a toe circle - pop off on the low bar in an uneven bar set, you can aim your feet at or just above the high bar for a visual cue.

Another thing is you are crunching your head forward when your toes come off (before you let go). That makes it harder to "throw" yourself into the front salto, which you really need to do in order to rotate fast enough. You're probably doing it because you want to see where you're going, which is natural.

Don't know if you've already done this or have space to set it up, but a good drill is to stack mats up to about bar height in front of a low bar, with about 1.5 feet between the mats and the bar. Get on the bar facing the mats, and do your toe circle pop off to stand on the mats. Then do the same thing but over-rotate so that you land on your stomach on the mats, missing your feet. If you can do that with a lot of height and good body position, you're basically doing the first part of the toe on front off and you're in a really good position to add the salto.
 
To answer the giants question, I think that depends. It's harder to do a toe-on from a giant than just a giant by itself or a giant-giant - if you have any technique/body shaping issues in the giant you will really notice when you try to connect them. If you can cast higher or do a cast handstand into your toe-on, you'd get a bit more power and that would be more like doing it from a giant.

I've never personally worked toe-on fronts but what I see from the gif is you are popping your toes off the bar way too early. The earlier your toes come off, the less height you will have when you flip. Right now when your toes come off, you are only horizontal (parallel with the ground). If you do a toe circle - pop off on the low bar in an uneven bar set, you can aim your feet at or just above the high bar for a visual cue.

Another thing is you are crunching your head forward when your toes come off (before you let go). That makes it harder to "throw" yourself into the front salto, which you really need to do in order to rotate fast enough. You're probably doing it because you want to see where you're going, which is natural.

Don't know if you've already done this or have space to set it up, but a good drill is to stack mats up to about bar height in front of a low bar, with about 1.5 feet between the mats and the bar. Get on the bar facing the mats, and do your toe circle pop off to stand on the mats. Then do the same thing but over-rotate so that you land on your stomach on the mats, missing your feet. If you can do that with a lot of height and good body position, you're basically doing the first part of the toe on front off and you're in a really good position to add the salto.
Thanks so much! I'll definitely work on that.
 
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