ADD and Athletics thread

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I'm starting this with a response to a related thread, but this thread is for random questions or insight into athletes with ADD. I think we all have questions or can give great advice, so here's a place for it. I put 'Athletics' in the title rather than simply gymnastics because I think it all relates back to the same general principles of safety, fun, and overall well being and development of children. I did a search for this topic and didn't get anything, so here goes!


This could be similar to my son's experiences in wrestling as well. Linsul perhaps looking up sports in general and how it, ADD/ADHD ,impacts performance in any sport. My son has ADD and takes his meds all day. He trains so hard, but at times has a hard time putting all his moves learned on the mat when it counts at his meets. Thank you in advance. I'd be curious to see what you can find. These kids in any sport want to do so well; it's a shame when it doesn't happen.

I'm going to link some of the articles I found here. So far I only have this one regarding gym and ADD specifically, but I'll edit as I update. Much of what I found in that article can be translated to other sports as well.

The more I look at it and the more people I talk to the more interesting it becomes. I went to the gym today for my daughters class and was sitting in the lobby. A lady whose daughter I coach was there for a make up class and we got to talking about it. Her daughter has ADD, I've been working with her for over a year. She was very helpful in explaining why certain coaches work with her daughter well in her estimation. Also what she relays to the doctor, which is quite a bit. When I got home and looked into it more and got to thinking about how many kids I coach that I know have ADD, it's a significant number.

From what I'm reading and what I hear from parents, the parent/doctor/athlete parts of dealing with ADD are in place quite well. Very often it's the coaching aspect that's got a big question mark due to lack of communication. This was brought up by the parent I talked to today, she says the doctor would probably benefit a lot more from hearing directly from coaches rather than relaying of info. She's worried about the possibility of things getting lost in translation. Long story short her doctor has my cell number now for any specific questions. I'm glad for it too, the medications sometimes prescribed are very potent...if dosages are decided based off information from multiple sources I'd want it to be as specific as possible were it my kid.

This benefits me as well since I'll be able to ask any questions I have directly to the most medically knowledgeable source. I have a lot of questions. Mostly about extremes in behavior. They don't happen often, but I'd like to hear what the doctor would recommend to a coach confronted by very risky or argumentative behavior.

Here's the gymnastics specific article:
"Mind Body & Sports" - Dr. Ronald L. Kamm

Items of note from it:
1. Short time periods for short attention spans. Some ADHD gymnasts, rather than working out for three hours a day for two days a week, would do better with a schedule of one hour a day, five days a week. make sure a clock is visible. ADHD children can often control their behavior for a set amount of time if they know what that time is, and the time is clearly visible to them.



2. Communicate and coordinate efforts closely with parents. Somedays parents forget to give medication, or may give it to the gymnast so late that good ADHD control is not achieved until the final ten minutes of practice.



3. Look for antecedent activities outside the gym that may be followed by an increase in target behavior during practice. For example, contrary to popular belief, physical activity does not decrease ADHD behavior. In general, therefore, a parent should not bring an ADHD child to practice directly from a softball game, after which they will likely be stimulated, or directly from swimming practice, after which they are likely to be fatigued. Fatigue makes ADHD worse. In addition, parens should try not to get into power struggles or arguments with the gymnast on the way to practice, as this will predispose the child to argumentativeness and oppositionalism in the gym.



4. Be prepared to handle other parents' resentment. It is important to be able to explain to the parents of other children that an ADHD gymnast has a medical condition that needs to be accommodated in a special way, and that you would do the same for any other child with any other condition.



5. Small classes and close adult supervision are optimal. At times, it is best for an ADHD child to come to those practices that are sparsely attended so that the coach / gymnast ratio is favorable. Parents may need to adjust their schedule so that the gymnast can be brought to these optimal practices.



6. Try to showcase the gymnast. One ADHD gymnast glittered at promotional shows because he was able to do a flip that others could not. The audience "oohed and aahed," which greatly enhanced the gymnast's self-esteem.



7. Provide structure. ADHD children respond best to routine, and the best coach for an ADHD gymnast is one who is very organized and structured, and whose workouts go as planned. In addition, the coach should review with the gymnast what is expected of them each time they line up for each apparatus.



8. "Be a slot machine for praise." ADHD children are in constant need of reward and praise. When a child follows the rules, heap on the praise.



9. Act, don't yack. Avoid "stepping into the arena" and engaging in debate with an ADHD child. You'll never "win." Either praise, withhold a point, or give a time-out.



10. Look for welcome behaviors and count on unwelcome behaviors. ADHD children have bad days and good days, just like the rest of us.
 
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This topic is many kinds of awesome, especially since the very active kids end up in gyms & other sports.

I think half the kids I currently coach have ADHD. I like them, they like me, I'm similarly wired, it works out.

Stuff I've learned watching these kids grow into the accomplished athletes they are:

Never ever ever ever ask an athlete with ADHD who's having a bad day if they forgot their meds. That's just unacceptable.

I've had a few who'll start on a frustrating note, and then the whole 'this is going to be a BAD practice' mindset sets in. So, off to get a drink and then we'll start over!

Frustrated daredevils get 'grounded' from skills if they're getting more upset and rushing things more. Upset + no fear + focusing difficulties = injury (stole this one from my old coaches, actually). Working on other things allows that feeling of competence AND tries to circumvent the "I can't do that" self fulfilling prophecy.

"Go find your focus on the trampoline". It doesn't work for everyone, but some of my kids collect their thoughts best while flying.

I've been known to pass around fidget toys during those times at meets when nothing is going to happen for a while. I think my ipod went around once, too, when the time before our session was both longer and more chaotic than anticipated.

"Please", "thank you" and extremely specific praise-like "wow, I love how confident you seemed on your flyaway!" goes over pretty well. Generic "nice job", not so much.
 
We have been using the trampoline since my DS was 4, BEFORE he was diagnosed with ADHD!!! We would tell him to jump until the ants were out if his pants...

Why do kids with ADHD need such a constant string of compliments? It requires so much energy and patience from the coaches to keep them at optimal performance....at least it seems that way to me...

I see it in the gym often...the super focused kids are given one command, and off they go to work at 100%, but not my kid...He clarifies, discusses it....then converses with a friend while walking over.....THEN begins the task, and then halfway through it, 'focus' kid is done, and ADHD kid is all alone, and says I guess I'll finish too......and does a poor job....

It takes a special coach to truly understand ADHD kids....I myself am not sure when DS needs understanding or a swift kick in the butt! I also have a hard time fostering that 'work for yourself, at 100%'. He still does his best when he has an audience! If he is alone, he gives it 60%...maybe.

I love my son to no end...I know this is the way he is and his accomplishments are great now, and will continue to be great. I don't doubt he will achieve his goals through sheer tenacity and hard work even if it takes longer.

THis is still a very interesting topic....I hardly ever speak about it at the gym.
I would love to hear more about how others deal with this at the gym....so many times I feel like we are the only ones.
 
Emma is has ADHD-inattentive type. Her coaches are aware of it. One coach works really well with her. The other pushes her buttons. Her behavior is well controlled with medicine, but she is not like the "typical" kid. I have broached this question time and time again on here. Added to it she is a perfectionist and her worst critic.
Any help is welcome.
 
As somebody who was diagnosed ADHD as a kid, I support this thread.

That is all, carry on.
 
I have a question especially for ADD ADHD parents or anyone who can help. I have coached a few ADD or ADHD kids and things go okay, sometimes you have to regain their attention but I had one that has flat out told me several times that her because of her ADHA she is allowed to be disrespectful, her words not mine. She is 8 so I doubt she made that up herself, either the doctor or her Mom told her that and it sickens me. She has become physically aggressive towards me twice and both times I told the Mother (who does not care) and the owner who was upset but didn't do anything about it. Granted she also has Bi Polar but so do a lot of people I know and it also does not mean you can act that way. So I guess my question is is there any truth in that? What behaviors do you allow them to get away with that you would not allow any other kid to do? And do you handle these kids any differently when they act out? The really bad thing was this child said this in front of the whole class and half of them raised their hand and said "I have ADD/ADHD too!" And she is disrespectful and I am not the only coach she acts like this with, so another question is this at all normal?
 
Medication adjustment

It is important to remember that as your child grows that the medication needs to be adjusted accordingly. Also the number of hours a child works out can affect the dosage since they can metabolize the medication more quickly.

I have an ADD child (not my gymmie, her older brother) and bad behavior was NEVER allowed. ADD does not give a license for disrespect and my kid knew it from very young. He has been on medication for about 10 years. The good news is that he is now an Eagle Scout, is a member of his high school marching band, and has a very responsible job as a lifeguard.
 
10.0 ADHD or ADD is not a license to be rude or obnoxious. That is just bad parenting. I would let the parent know that their child will be sent home if it happens again, so she will be expecting your call that is!

I would also tell the training group, before any incident, that you have decided that rude behaviour will not be tolerated in your classes, not matter what. I would also let them know that the consequence of being rude is being sent home.
 
Bad behavior is NEVER accepted. There are consequences at home for it. Not allowed at all. ADD is something my child has to learn to deal with. I do my part which is to provide the medicine. She must do her part which is learn to control emotions. Medicine is adjusted as needed with the dr's help and her input. She is not allowed to act out. ADD is a way of life not an excuse. We have her on 2 pills a day. One in the morning and one at 1:30. The last one gets her through gymnastics. If behavior at gym is not ideal, then no gym for her the next class. We have rules and consquences posted at the house that we follow. Her symptoms are easy frustrated. That is ithe worst one.
 
I have a question about dosage goals. A parent of a level 5 gymnast I know was talking about it and I want to know if others see this too.

She said her daughter without the medication during summer uptraining and got a lot of new skills. Her coaches were happy. When she started medicating again just before school, coaches said she was fearful. (I'm wondering if she was actually fearful or just less likely to take risk without thought or question.) So the mom stopped medicating her in the afternoon so she could go to practice, but it was disastrous since they were focused on routines at that point and all the details. Her daughter was very vocally bored, but clearly needed to work on the little things more. When given the afternoon pill pre-practice to help her focus on routines more, her mom said she 'was practically catatonic.'

Whats interesting there to me is she wasn't like that when they were still uptraining. The only thing noticeable was fear of new skills or ones she'd only recently gotten. I wish I knew the extent of that fear. If it was refusal or what. Medication + what she considered boring just shut her down. She did do the routines, but with a depressed brand of sloppy rather than rushed and bored.

So is having to balance fear, boredom, and focus the main goal as it pertains to medication and sports? Does that impact social interaction at all or do the 2 go hand in hand? I'm asking because I see medicinal options for normalizing brain function and ones are geared strictly for behavioral results. I suppose it would depend on the child in question though It's a lot to balance for sure.
 
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ADHD should never be an excuse for bad behavior, hands down. These are not children of limited mental capacity who do not know the difference between right and wrong and should be treated as such. I think there is a big difference between catering to an individuals needs and the individual using those specific needs as an excuse. Yes, it is your job to make the gym the best environment you can for the child experiencing difficulties, but they also have a job to try their hardest to make the experience a productive one.
I would also like to use this thread to emphasize the importance of communication between parents and coaches regarding ADHD and any other difficulties a child may be experiencing whether physical, mental, or personal. It really makes a world of difference for all involved. If it is a matter you/your child does not want discussed out in the open, there are specifics that can be left out, but the coach needs a general idea of why the child is acting the way they are. I have worked with children before who have just driven me nuts only to find out they have ADHD, asperger's, are dealing with a crummy family situation, etc. and it really changes me perspective when dealing with that child.
 
So is having to balance fear, boredom, and focus the main goal as it pertains to medication and sports? Does that impact social interaction at all or do the 2 go hand in hand? I'm asking because I see medicinal options for normalizing brain function and ones are geared strictly for behavioral results. I suppose it would depend on the child in question though It's a lot to balance for sure.

(disclaimer: I'm an adult with ADHHHD among a few other quirks, so I know how MY brain works medicated and non but that's not globally applicable)

I know that for me, and at least one of my gymnasts, the social comes a lot easier when the ADHD is treated. Between impulsivity and the whole feeling out of control causing anxiety, social acumen can really suffer. Likeability, too.

As for in sports like gym, the focus and toning down the daredevil are what I see as the goals. Sometimes fear is healthy. It's your brain making you think over whether what you are attempting is actually a good idea. That's preferable to FIRE AIM READY! or realizing in the middle of a skill that it was actually an unwise thing to attempt. Boredom is my thing, as coach, to manage. Detail work doesn't HAVE to be boring.

And for the sciency bit, all the stimulants do basically the same thing anyway to different degrees, neurochemically speaking. I kinda care less about brain chemistry being 'normal' than about being able to function optimally.
 
I think a parent who allows their child to be rude/physical is giving them an excuse because she doesn't want to parent. The more structure you give an ADHD kid the better the result. Anyone who has a child that's been diagnosed will hopefully learn that before they start taking meds. Medication doesn't cure adhd, it just gives you brain a few extra seconds to stay in control. Regarding being off medication and seeing better results. ADHD for most kids means lack of impulse control. So no medications means not a lot of thinking before responding. My dd really puts in amazing stuff in the summer w/o taking anything. The funny thing is she looks sloppy on the meds when it comes to form. Keeping up with dosage is probably something I should look into. It may play a part in what is happening.
 
This is a great thread. For those who coach or have a child with ADHD, what are some key management strategies to do the best for these children? I coach a five year old, who could really benefit if I improved my knowledge and behaviour management.
 
This is a great thread. For those who coach or have a child with ADHD, what are some key management strategies to do the best for these children? I coach a five year old, who could really benefit if I improved my knowledge and behaviour management.

Charts and behavior charts work really well. Set up the expectations-Five behavior rules, 5 rewards, and five consequences. The rewards are a smily face a day, icecream at the end of the week, special treat at the end of the month. Consequences are more specific to my daughter-sad face, no gymnastics, no teaching, etc. She works really well having her guideline spelled out for her.

At gym, her coach is setting a goal chart up for her. Stars for goals achieved. It will go with her throughout the meet season. It will give her something to work toward.
Honestly, stating what you want and how it will be done and consequences helps a lot.
 
This is a great thread. For those who coach or have a child with ADHD, what are some key management strategies to do the best for these children? I coach a five year old, who could really benefit if I improved my knowledge and behaviour management.

I tried something last night with a pre school group that might work well as far as giving them an energy outlet for between stations, waiting for others to finish getting their drinks and such. I gave them all a small hula hoop, and they could do whatever they wanted that fit inside the edges of it. They did jumping jacks, tuck jumps, and donkey kicks. They kept their hoops with them the whole class, and the only rules were that they couldn't hit anybody with them, and had to sit in them when I asked them to when it was time to listen to instructions. The sitting part was the best, having a boundary between kids was awesome as far as getting them to pay attention!
 
I just caught myself thanking everyone in this thread! But Linsul, THANK YOU, sincerely for taking it upon yourself to research this topic. I have to ask you, are you considering the teaching profession? Our students of the world would benefit from your thoughtful, well organized, child friendly demeanor.
My DD the gymnast is also without ADD/ADHD. It is my son the wrestler/football player who was diagnosed with ADD. He isn't so much hyperactive, but he lacks focus tremendously. When he was younger, we ran into some serious problems with coaches he had. To top it all off this child was also diagnosed with anxiety as a 7 year old. He feared going to school and leaving us. It prompted us to go to the most reputable children's hospital in our area to get him tested, etc. He was subjected to various tests and in the end was medicated with a strong dose of meds, Zoloft and Concerta, and it really made his anxious bouts so much better. However, we also moved him from schools to a school that nurtured the great points in him and helped him overcome his problems. It also helped that his teacher had anxiety and she was so knowledgeable on top of being so supportive. Well to make a long story shorter, we had to move him from schools again four years later because of monetary reasons, the school was $6,500/year. Plus as he aged, he found it hard to mesh his school friends with his neighborhood friends and that brought up another set of problems that made him very anxious.
Teachers at his current school are not as supportive. Something as easy as asking him to check his bag to ensure he has his work assignments in his book bag is kicked back as that HE needs to be made more responsible. No kidding, but perhaps this little gesture could get him on that right path. I strongly believe the adults of this world have to take an interest in all children. Whether they are your own or not. The success of a child translates into success for all people. These little people need all of our help.
My son has a psychiatrist, counselor, social worker- a team of support along with his loving parents who truly believe he can accomplish anything. Yet we are still a missing link because his teachers are not on board. Negative behavior has never been tolerated from my son. We don't give excuses. However, sometimes when a child with ADD/anxiety has a melt down, yelling will never make it better. Praise does the trick and with serious melt downs sending them to a quite place to collect themselves is beneficial.
The Lord knows how many trials we experienced this last year with my son's teachers. Part of his problems were exasperated with his negative behavior, but SOME of those situations stemmed from his poor self-esteem at the hands of his teachers and negative comments they made to him. Linsul, I am going to print your article and send it off to my son's school. You will not imagine how many schooled professionals-teachers- who seriously have a lot to learn about how to appropriately deal with all children, let alone children with mental disabilities. I am grateful that my son does not have a physical disability, but sometimes I wonder that if he did would his teachers be more accepting of him. Why do we have to see a physical disability to come to the aid of the child. A mental disability needs our attention as well. They are chemically wired this way. Meds help to regulate their moods, impulsiveness, and focus.
So far the school year has started out great, but I hope it holds out. I always talk with him about behavior before he goes to school and let him know he is accountable for his actions. He's a good kid who wants to do good. It's my job to give him pointers of how to get there.

Thank you for reading this entire post. As you can see, I am deeply devoted to finding solutions to this myself. Linsul you have re-inspired me! Thanks so much Friend!!:)
 
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This one is very interesting not in a clinical sense, but apparently ADD/ADHD are very commonly misdiagnosed. The article quotes the number of misdiagnosed cases as approximately 1 million per year. To nail down the biological basis could help a lot for future diagnoses and targeted treatment.

Link Removed
 
I just caught myself thanking everyone in this thread! But Linsul, THANK YOU, sincerely for taking it upon yourself to research this topic. I have to ask you, are you considering the teaching profession? Our students of the world would benefit from your thoughtful, well organized, child friendly demeanor.

Thank you!! Recent circumstance has been bringing me to this topic repeatedly. I couldn't not look, it was as if the universe was screaming at me with signs I should care a whole lot more. I don't have any plans to teach, but I'm open to a lot of possibilities. Right now coaching is fulfilling and fits my schedule. My primary role is 'mom' at the moment, facilitated greatly by my husbands job paying the bills; considering the economy I'm extremely grateful! Coaching and momming have been mutually beneficial to each other. When I get stumped or frustrated the thing that brings me back to reality fastest is remembering I'm dealing with someones baby, their world. Adjusting accordingly is something I bring home when my kids make me want to pull out my hair! Teaching is attractive for many of the same reasons I love coaching, but I'd have to go back to school for it I think...so maybe when my son starts kindergarten!


My DD the gymnast is also without ADD/ADHD. It is my son the wrestler/football player who was diagnosed with ADD. He isn't so much hyperactive, but he lacks focus tremendously. When he was younger, we ran into some serious problems with coaches he had. To top it all off this child was also diagnosed with anxiety as a 7 year old. He feared going to school and leaving us. It prompted us to go to the most reputable children's hospital in our area to get him tested, etc. He was subjected to various tests and in the end was medicated with a strong dose of meds, Zoloft and Concerta, and it really made his anxious bouts so much better. However, we also moved him from schools to a school that nurtured the great points in him and helped him overcome his problems. It also helped that his teacher had anxiety and she was so knowledgeable on top of being so supportive. Well to make a long story shorter, we had to move him from schools again four years later because of monetary reasons, the school was $6,500/year. Plus as he aged, he found it hard to mesh his school friends with his neighborhood friends and that brought up another set of problems that made him very anxious.


I'm sad but not surprised to hear that excellent treatment by teachers came with a hefty price tag. It shouldn't have to be that way :( I really hope that, and it sounds like, your time at the school gave you some tips on how to get the best from your son. One of the more surprising things I've been seeing again and again is that kids with ADD are really affected by the perception that they failed in understanding a social interaction. I know I've made well meaning mistakes in that area. Specifically, in telling a gymnast with ADD that she wasn't in trouble for messing up a skill she had after she reacted by withdrawal when given a correction. I think now if I had walked away with a pat on the back and the offer to help if she needed it she could have recovered faster. By talking to her and spelling out what I meant by what I said I just added to what she percieved as a failure. Mistakes like that are so avoidable....and by a google search no less! I should've done it sooner!


Teachers at his current school are not as supportive. Something as easy as asking him to check his bag to ensure he has his work assignments in his book bag is kicked back as that HE needs to be made more responsible. No kidding, but perhaps this little gesture could get him on that right path. I strongly believe the adults of this world have to take an interest in all children. Whether they are your own or not. The success of a child translates into success for all people. These little people need all of our help.

Oh I totally hear you on the assignments and the HUGE leap in personal responsibility school brings!! My daughter had major issues in linking homework effort, to test effort, and how results of that all played into her grades as a whole. I'm 100% sure she STILL doesn't get it. I still find her homework laying around some nights, it's.....a struggle a lot of the time. Or I'll look at the classwork sent home and find 3 of the same thing with 100% and then a 4th exact same assignment with a ZERO! I'll ask her why, and she'll just shrug...like 'I dunno mom lol!' I make her sit and do it right then send it back Monday with a note for the teacher saying I don't expect her to get credit but that she's turning it in as a sign she's being held accountable at home for what she should be doing in school. I agree children's success is tremendously important from a societal standpoint, and that they should have guidance and help available to get by.


My son has a psychiatrist, counselor, social worker- a team of support along with his loving parents who truly believe he can accomplish anything. Yet we are still a missing link because his teachers are not on board. Negative behavior has never been tolerated from my son. We don't give excuses. However, sometimes when a child with ADD/anxiety has a melt down, yelling will never make it better. Praise does the trick and with serious melt downs sending them to a quite place to collect themselves is beneficial.
The Lord knows how many trials we experienced this last year with my son's teachers. Part of his problems were exasperated with his negative behavior, but SOME of those situations stemmed from his poor self-esteem at the hands of his teachers and negative comments they made to him. Linsul, I am going to print your article and send it off to my son's school. You will not imagine how many schooled professionals-teachers- who seriously have a lot to learn about how to appropriately deal with all children, let alone children with mental disabilities. I am grateful that my son does not have a physical disability, but sometimes I wonder that if he did would his teachers be more accepting of him. Why do we have to see a physical disability to come to the aid of the child. A mental disability needs our attention as well. They are chemically wired this way. Meds help to regulate their moods, impulsiveness, and focus.
So far the school year has started out great, but I hope it holds out. I always talk with him about behavior before he goes to school and let him know he is accountable for his actions. He's a good kid who wants to do good. It's my job to give him pointers of how to get there.

From the medical side the potent nature of the medication and what goes into prescribing it was one thing I was very interested in. As a parent I'm sure it's a very serious decision. Add to that the fact that it's based on input from people in contact with the child and their activities; I want to be VERY precise in what to look for and what to relay to a parent who is asking for information that could result in dosage or medication change. That's their baby, these are potent drugs, it's a big deal.

What you said about your son having a physical disability rather than a mental one really sticks out to me. Something visual would be a constant reminder, I get it. I wonder the same thing about ADD when it comes to coaching. We'd absolutely cater to a child with a physical disability, we have to train ourselves to keep in mind that the nature of the child we're dealing with and what ground rules apply. It's also something that can't be kept a secret. I wish more parents would be open and up front about ADD to coaches and extra curricular activity leaders. Through my interest in it and public conversations I'm realizing it's more prevalent than I previously thought. I'll say it again...I should've looked into this sooner!

I'm really glad the beginning of the year has gone well so far for your son! I sincerely hope it keeps up! I'm sure you're armed with lots of experience, and your support group sounds very secure. I think your son is lucky to have a mom so adamant about preserving his dignity through the process of growing up with ADD. Keep pressure on the teachers to help you out, I've found I have to be just as vigilant with my daughters teachers as I am with her. It's completely frustrating sometimes. I do think that the reminder that I'm there and paying attention keeps my daughter from being the target of a teachers bad day. As sad as it sounds, I can say I've had to call the school over 'bad behavior' marks that are a total joke.

Thank you for reading this entire post. As you can see, I am deeply devoted to finding solutions to this myself. Linsul you have re-inspired me! Thanks so much Friend!!:)

I'm very very very very glad :) Keep us updated on what you find, and always share your experience! Moms are invaluable when it comes to educating and inspiring one another about kids. Science is wonderful, but I have a lotta love for practical experience!
 
The Lord knows how many trials we experienced this last year with my son's teachers. Part of his problems were exasperated with his negative behavior, but SOME of those situations stemmed from his poor self-esteem at the hands of his teachers and negative comments they made to him. Linsul, I am going to print your article and send it off to my son's school. You will not imagine how many schooled professionals-teachers- who seriously have a lot to learn about how to appropriately deal with all children, let alone children with mental disabilities. I am grateful that my son does not have a physical disability, but sometimes I wonder that if he did would his teachers be more accepting of him. Why do we have to see a physical disability to come to the aid of the child. A mental disability needs our attention as well. They are chemically wired this way. Meds help to regulate their moods, impulsiveness, and focus.
Thank you for reading this entire post. As you can see, I am deeply devoted to finding solutions to this myself. Linsul you have re-inspired me! Thanks so much Friend!!:)
First, I would like to thank you for taking such an active approach in your son's schooling, more parents need to do that! While I was not diagnosed with ADHD, I did have another disorder that made school and learning VERY difficult for me, even with my parents constantly intervening. I was made by many teachers to feel like I was stupid, a failure, a waste of time, etc. and I would NEVER want that for any other child. By stepping in and interacting with teachers and administration at your son's school you are potentially making a huge difference for not only your son but other children with similar problems who come along in the future which is huge. Teachers, coaches, and other individuals dealing with children really need, as a whole, a greater understanding of emotional/mental disabilities.
And I would also like to second your thanks to Linsul for taking the time and effort to look into this topic. The world, especially those dealing with children, really need more people like you to put forth the effort to develop at least a basic knowledge of these issues, especially ones that are so common in children. Thanks so much for your effort!
 

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