Parents Elite around the world

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Lilou

Proud Parent
Purely my brain going off on tangents and being curious so figured I'd post here. I kinda get how gymnasts get to be elite in the US, but are the requirements and skills the same in other countries? Like going elite in Japan or South Africa, the same as here? I remember reading about a gymnast in the US competing for another country and it was pretty controversial. Plus, we've been pretty dominant in the US, so it made me wonder if our requirements for reaching an elite level are harder than other countries.
 
Depends on what you mean by elite. Does it simply mean competing internationally for your country? If so, yes becoming elite is easier in countries where the talent pool is more narrow. Of course everyone competing internationally under FIG rules has to meet the composition requirements etc, but in some countries like mine you can get to National Team and compete internationally with very basic routines because there are only handful of seniors who can actually even meet the composition requirements!

I'm sure that there are hundreds of level 10 gymnasts in the US who don't even get college scholarships or who can't even dream of becoming elite in the US, and they would easily beat many of our National Team members by 2-4 points even under FIG rules.
 
In Australia our elite system was designed by Mihai Brestayan as he is our national coach. It has changed signifinactly as it was just recently designed. The kids do the normal level system generally to level 9. Then after level 9 they can do future international, which is like a pre Junior international level. For this they do both compulsory routines and optional routines, a little like the hopes program in the USA.

This is reccomended and not compulsory. Anyone can choose to compete international without a specific qualifying criteria. Competitons have the Junior and Senior international divisions, and compete FIG requirements. You can be invited to attend training camps based on comp results, and a combination of camp success and competition success can lead to being selected for the national team and for international assignments.

The skill level required to be selected is significantly lower than the US. We have a far smaller population, as well as far less gyms with the staff and facilities capable of getting kids to elite. Far fewer kids stick with the sport through high school as well. We don't have college gymnastics, so there isnt the same pull to stay in the sport when the stress and the hours start to increase.
 
Purely my brain going off on tangents and being curious so figured I'd post here. I kinda get how gymnasts get to be elite in the US, but are the requirements and skills the same in other countries? Like going elite in Japan or South Africa, the same as here? I remember reading about a gymnast in the US competing for another country and it was pretty controversial. Plus, we've been pretty dominant in the US, so it made me wonder if our requirements for reaching an elite level are harder than other countries.

If you watched the American Cup over the weekend, you saw the vast difference in gymnastics skills between the US, Canada and Japan and pretty much the rest of the world.
 
Elite is a label you use in the US but really you mean 'competing FIG rules' . A lot of people compete FIG around the world. Just to various standards. I think the benchmark to qualify Junior and Senior US elite optional routines is very hard. That is a very high score.
 
I can talk about France and Georgia (the latter not being this interesting considering our International Elite train abroad)

In France you go through different "Levels", it is not necessary to do them all, you can start at a National Level or go straight from the lowest to the highest level, usually girls who compete national level at a young age can be selected to enter a national training center (there are about 6 of them i think, they can make it to training center at every age >9 ) then they are in the elite world, then can for different reasons go back to club gymnastics. To compete at Elite nationals they need to score a certain score.
In 2018 those scores were:
48.5 Seniors
46.5 2003 juniors
44.5 2004 juniors
41.5 2005 Hopes
40.5 2006 Hopes
42 2007 Nationals
41 2008 Nationals

In Georgia we are scored on FIG code really early (SV modified for lower levels) we have no choice for elite gymnasts so usually they are selected by our federation president and head coach Rusudan Sikharulidze (former elite gymnast) to be sent to international meets (based on videos if they train abroad)
 
I can talk about France and Georgia (the latter not being this interesting considering our International Elite train abroad)

In France you go through different "Levels", it is not necessary to do them all, you can start at a National Level or go straight from the lowest to the highest level, usually girls who compete national level at a young age can be selected to enter a national training center (there are about 6 of them i think, they can make it to training center at every age >9 ) then they are in the elite world, then can for different reasons go back to club gymnastics. To compete at Elite nationals they need to score a certain score.
In 2018 those scores were:
48.5 Seniors
46.5 2003 juniors
44.5 2004 juniors
41.5 2005 Hopes
40.5 2006 Hopes
42 2007 Nationals
41 2008 Nationals

In Georgia we are scored on FIG code really early (SV modified for lower levels) we have no choice for elite gymnasts so usually they are selected by our federation president and head coach Rusudan Sikharulidze (former elite gymnast) to be sent to international meets (based on videos if they train abroad)
That is crazy, 48.5 is the score needed to qualify as a HOPES 12/13 year old. 50.5 for junior elite.
 

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