Do you need a certain score to move up from level 4 to 5

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Apr 3, 2008
59
Does anyone know if you need to score a certain AA in level 4 before you can move up to level 5? I thought I read somewhere that you don't need the score at level 4 to move to level 5, but once you get to level 5, you do need certain skills to move up.

thanks :)
 
G

GymVamp

ok i am just guessing but i don't think you need a certain aa in level 4 to move to 5 cuz you don't need to go to level 4 most gymnasts start out as a level 5 but that is just a guess!!!:)
 
D

Dallas Gym Mom

This is from the USAG website

The current USAG mobility scores required to move to the next level are:
Level 5 - 31.00 AA
Level 6 - 31.00 AA
Level 7 - 31.00 AA
Level 8 - 34.00 AA
Level 9 - 34.00 AA

However, there is an exception if a gymnast has had previous competitive
experience and is at least 14 years old and is in high school. She would
be eligible to petition the State Administrative Committee for entry
into Level 7. The petition must be accompanied by a video that
demonstrates her skill level.
 
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gymdog

Coach
Jul 5, 2007
5,120
Just to clarify further, I'm pretty sure those are the mobility scores to move OUT of each level. Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but I'm pretty sure you don't need the 34.00 to move TO level 8, just out of it.

Gymnasts can enter L5 competition at age 7, without previously having competed L4.

However it also bears mentioning that most of the time, achieving these minimum scores after competing a season at a level probably would not qualify the gymnast skillwise to move to the next competitive level (though anything is possible). These are bare minimums.
 
Apr 3, 2008
59
Thanks to all the replied. I was looking it up and from what I read, didn't think she need an AA score for her level 4. A mom keeps insisting that she needs to get an AA score of 34 in a level 4 meet before she can go to level 5. My daughter did level 4 last year, but in the rec league.. She got moved up to USA team for this year!!
 

UnoMas

Proud Parent
Aug 16, 2008
3,735
our gym requires a 36AA and participation on L4 state meet to move from L4 to L5.
So, even though USAG does not require a score to move from L4 to L5, many gyms do require a certain score.
 

NotAMom

Active Member
May 27, 2009
894
Region 6 (Northeast)
Our gym doesn't have a defined L4 to L5 min (or max for that matter) score. To them, it's more important to have most of the one-up skills, to have the desire AND to be mentally mature enough.
 
C

cheryl1960

I agree, the actual score out numbers are the bare minimum required to move into the next level, but this does not mean that a gymnast is competent at these skills consistently. Most gyms that I know of want a higher score-usually between 34-36 before they move girls to the next level.
I think it also depends on what your goals are. some gymnasts who don't want to compete in the compulsories score out but compete in optionals (alternative to JO). This way, they can work on more difficult skills, but still compete in a state or regional meet at a USA JO level. It can be very confusing-the coach should be able to explain his/her plans for the team girls.
 

GetaGrip

Active Member
Jun 26, 2009
568
California
In my gym you need a 31 to pass off level 6, but if you want to compete level 7 in the next spring you need to get a 34. I think our standards are a little low, so I'd recommend a 33 to move up.
 

Geoffrey Taucer

Staff member
Gold Membership
Coach
Jan 21, 2007
4,504
Baltimore, MD
I think it's silly to use scores as a criteria to evaluate whether a gymnast is ready to move up, especially when you're looking at the move from 6 to 7. If the kid has the necessary skills to their coaches' satisfaction, they're ready to move up. Why is it necessary to learn the precise one-size-fits-all choreography of a level 6 routine to determine whether a kid is ready to do a routine specifically tailored to their abilities?
 
Apr 15, 2009
94
Washington State
I think it's silly to use scores as a criteria to evaluate whether a gymnast is ready to move up, especially when you're looking at the move from 6 to 7. If the kid has the necessary skills to their coaches' satisfaction, they're ready to move up. Why is it necessary to learn the precise one-size-fits-all choreography of a level 6 routine to determine whether a kid is ready to do a routine specifically tailored to their abilities?

I whole-heartedly agree with you!
 
Apr 3, 2008
59
I think it's silly to use scores as a criteria to evaluate whether a gymnast is ready to move up, especially when you're looking at the move from 6 to 7. If the kid has the necessary skills to their coaches' satisfaction, they're ready to move up. Why is it necessary to learn the precise one-size-fits-all choreography of a level 6 routine to determine whether a kid is ready to do a routine specifically tailored to their abilities?


Geoffrey,

I have to agree with you on your above post.. I really never looked at it the way you do.. but, I totally agree with what your saying!!!
 

AlexsGymmyMom

Proud Parent
Mar 20, 2009
2,531
USA
I think it's silly to use scores as a criteria to evaluate whether a gymnast is ready to move up, especially when you're looking at the move from 6 to 7. If the kid has the necessary skills to their coaches' satisfaction, they're ready to move up. Why is it necessary to learn the precise one-size-fits-all choreography of a level 6 routine to determine whether a kid is ready to do a routine specifically tailored to their abilities?


I also agree with you on this one. Our gym does not require any specific score to move to level 5. What is required is that you pass a kip test. I believe it is 3 low bar kips and one low hang kip on the high bar. As far as level 6 to seven goes I know they try to score them out of that level as quickly as possible. I hear that L6 is a bear in competitions.
 
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