Technical video question for coaches/judges/techies (Level 3 Vault)

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That's really good advice. I got similar advice from someone else. Because of it, we had her run slower to start and accelerate instead of starting at a sprint and staying there. She scored 9.775 at her state meet, so I think the advice helped.

You say "we had her....". Are you coaching your dd? If you are, as a parent/coach myself I would recommend that if you are not her "official" coach, you really should not be giving her technique advice. Stick to general encouragement. A parent is the cheerleader, banker and chauffeur for their child.
 
and i'll throw this in as a caution. if this was a yurchenko vault, and everything that goes in to making everything correct over a long period of time including the precise stride of the run...an innocent command by your hand could seriously injure your child. so serious that a contrary command, or 1 completely wrong could cause catastrophic injury and death. the end result score above was a coincidence this time. that's all. no smiley.
 
You say "we had her....". Are you coaching your dd? If you are, as a parent/coach myself I would recommend that if you are not her "official" coach, you really should not be giving her technique advice. Stick to general encouragement. A parent is the cheerleader, banker and chauffeur for their child.

To me, the advice she was given WAS general. It's like, "Hold the handstand longer." or "Keep your legs together on bar." If the advice is general, already given by her coach and part of her routine, I have no problem giving it (or "reinforcing it" as is probably the more appropriate term). We don't let her do back handsprings at home because the skill is too technical.

and i'll throw this in as caution. if this was a yurchenko vault, and everything that goes in to making everything correct over a long period of time including the precise stride of the run...an innocent command by your hand could seriously injure your child. so serious that a contrary command, or 1 completely wrong could cause catastrophic injury and death. the end result score above was a coincidence this time. that's all. no smiley.

The suggestion was given by qualified individuals here on Chalk Bucket. The suggestion was also simply pointing out one of the things that is a part of the judging criteria and she worked the changes in front of her coach prior to competition. Don't assume that the suggestions I give are given with no regard to her safety and without speaking with her coach regularly. It simply isn't the case. The post was made to see if those with a technical eye could see anything that could be improved. When I received a suggestion, I verified its accuracy and then talked with her coach.
 
Are your level 3s being judged by official judges? Where I am from the level 3s are not judged by official judges and the judges could be coaches or even older gymnasts. Needless to say the judging is a bit all over the place and we don't consider l3 scores "real scores". I would not worry yourself, your daughter or your dd's coach over these scores. They really don't matter. You will kill your dd's joy from the sport quicker than you will ever figure out scoring.
 
Are your level 3s being judged by official judges? Where I am from the level 3s are not judged by official judges and the judges could be coaches or even older gymnasts. Needless to say the judging is a bit all over the place and we don't consider l3 scores "real scores". I would not worry yourself, your daughter or your dd's coach over these scores. They really don't matter.

thinking the same thing. not to take away from OP's dd - she seems to be a talented little one but worrying about scores at this low introductory level just isn't worth it. Enjoy the process - don't worry about the scores or the places. there will be plenty of time for that in years to come.
 
Are your level 3s being judged by official judges? Where I am from the level 3s are not judged by official judges and the judges could be coaches or even older gymnasts. Needless to say the judging is a bit all over the place and we don't consider l3 scores "real scores". I would not worry yourself, your daughter or your dd's coach over these scores. They really don't matter. You will kill your dd's joy from the sport quicker than you will ever figure out scoring.

The best advice given by far. It's far too easy to get over Involved in scores and rankings in this sport. She's a level 3. She should just be having a great time and building lots of friendships in her gym right now she should not be concerned about whether or not she's a "champion" at this point. I, and many others here, have seen a child's joy sucked right out of his sport by the
Parents' focus on scores, pushing their kids for advancement before they're ready and the constant "gym talk" at home. Your child is so much more than her gymnastics.
 
I haven't followed this whole thread, but you say the suggestion was giving by a qualified individual here on Chalk Bucket.Um, I've been here longer than you and kind of have a feel for who knows their stuff and who doesn't, but I would never read something from someone here, no matter how qualified I thought the person was, and share that advice with my gymnast daughter, I save all that advice to come from the coaches at her gym.
To me, the advice she was given WAS general. It's like, "Hold the handstand longer." or "Keep your legs together on bar." If the advice is general, already given by her coach and part of her routine, I have no problem giving it (or "reinforcing it" as is probably the more appropriate term). We don't let her do back handsprings at home because the skill is too technical.



The suggestion was given by qualified individuals here on Chalk Bucket. The suggestion was also simply pointing out one of the things that is a part of the judging criteria and she worked the changes in front of her coach prior to competition. Don't assume that the suggestions I give are given with no regard to her safety and without speaking with her coach regularly. It simply isn't the case. The post was made to see if those with a technical eye could see anything that could be improved. When I received a suggestion, I verified its accuracy and then talked with her coach.
 
I, and many others here, have seen a child's joy sucked right out of his sport by the
Parents' focus on scores, pushing their kids for advancement before they're ready and the constant "gym talk" at home. Your child is so much more than her gymnastics.

I would add that even though many little girls starting out are ALL about gymnastics - eat, sleep, drink it - it is our job as parents to temper it to a reasonable level. I am not directing this at the OP. It is just a statement in general, having lived through it myself and not recognizing I was one of "those" parents until a couple years into it and I started reading posts here from newbie gym parents. Really opened my eyes.
 
I would be very cautious about even getting "qualified" gymnastics advice from coaches other than your daughter's coach. I am not a coach and do not know all the technical aspects of teaching skills, but I do know enough to know that not every coach is going to teach all skills the same way and it can confuse and even injure your child to have conflicting information. It took me a while to learn to just totally trust the coaches that they know what they are doing and to not mess with it.
This will be important especially as your child moves through compulsories. I remember reading a discussion here before about certain skills that some coaches will purposefully take the deduction on in compulsories as they feel doing it differently will better prepare them for later skills. An example for you- my dd had difficulty sticking her front tumbling pass this year, because she had so much power. Her coach told her not to worry about it, because she needs the power to prepare for adding to the pass next year. It would have been counterproductive for her to "kill" the power and then to have to re-learn it with power to add a skill to it.
So, all that to say, you could post a video of your daughters routine and ask how she could improve your score, and people could tell you what to do, and yes, it might lead to an extra tenth or two in her score, but it may actually backfire for her long term progress.
Bottom line, trust the coaches and let them do their job. If they are good coaches, they know exactly what your dd needs for long-term success in this sport.
 
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WOW! The range she is at is GREAT! So just have her keep doing what shes doing.. The pre-flight is good and she is pointed so that's good..
 

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