WAG L9 overshoot vs. overshoot to handstand (potential deductions?)

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Fina

Proud Parent
Aug 1, 2020
19
My daughter is getting frustrated and needs a high to low bar release. She is working on the overshoot to handstand. I want to suggest to her that she try a B skill overshoot until she can safely catch her handstand. I just want to give her advise to help relieve the pressure... She has strong handstands otherwise so I am wondering if she would get a deduction for the overshoot without the handstand in that bar change. She is able to toe shoot and reliably casts to handstand. If anyone can advise, I would appreciate. Thanks
 

novagymmom

Proud Parent
May 19, 2020
154
49
I am fairly certain that an overshoot is a C if it is either from OR to a handstand. (My daughter's was admittedly neither.) The challenge when you don't end in a handstand is that it is a lot more difficult to control the glide out of it depending on the angle they come in on.
 

mom2newgymnast

Proud Parent
Jul 8, 2014
1,228
48
Yeah, most, or at least a lot of, level 9s (at least that I saw) don't end in handstand. I don't think that is unusual at all at level 9. The majority I saw started at handstand though and were still C skills. If it starts AND ends at handstand then it is a D. If neither are handstand, then it is a B.

If you are talking about one without handstand at the start or end, which I assume you are, does she have a C skill somewhere in her routine? Does she have any connection bonuses that would be affected? Maybe if you mentioned what skills she has in her routine, that would help?
 

Fina

Proud Parent
Aug 1, 2020
19
Thank you all for your replies. these insights were Very helpful in understanding this skill
 

Geoffrey Taucer

Staff member
Gold Membership
Coach
Jan 21, 2007
4,458
Baltimore, MD
Last I checked (disclaimer: that was the previous code, not the current one), overshoot from handstand on high bar to handstand on low bar was a D, removing either handstand puts it down to a C, and removing both makes it a B.

HOWEVER

From a purely technical standpoint, it's more efficient to train it directly to handstand than to train it low and then build up to handstand. In a perfect world, the D version is the only one I would ever want to teach, because training other variants means practicing suboptimal technique.

In the real world, sometimes it's better to stick to optimal technique even if it takes longer, and sometimes it's better to make concessions on technique in order to have a routine ready and circumvent the frustration of a skill that takes a long time to learn. How exactly to balance this is an individual coaching decision.

(If it were me, I'd generally be much more willing to compromise on the handstand at the beginning than at the end, but I won't go so far as to say I'd never teach it below handstand)
 
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